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With change coming faster than ever, is the best way to handle change is to treat it as another process?
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Technically, it's a process.

But it would be a major mistake to approach it from a technical perspective.

This is one of those cases where methodology eats technology for breakfast.
CEO, Co-founder, Profluo
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  1. more than a month ago
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It is a process but it is a configurable process. It has to be adapted to the situation at hand. More important, it's a tool and, like any tool, its effectiveness depends on the skill of its user.
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 2
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Change management differs in three ways . . . .

1) it is a project and needs project planning, monitoring and control (look to CPM as the main method)
2) the project must be preceded by evolution of a strategy for any major proposed change (i.e. there is more to change management than time/ costs)
3) it requires change managers

Recommendation: don't waste time reading "change management for dummies"
References
  1. http://www.kwkeirstead.wordpress.com
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  1. more than a month ago
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Change Management (CM) was initially tied to technology - as in ERP systems - but today due to the emphasis on process automation and intelligent information management (IIM) is tied to culture and technology. While one can say it is a process or a tool, I see CM as transition from one state to the next. While process and technology are involved, and there are processes to follow during the transition, it should also be seen as an on-going practice of organizational and operational improvement. When you have a CM project or initiative in place, upon completion it should mark the beginning of continuous improvement and the user community should be taught and readied to take on this continuing improvement practice.
Bob Larrivee
President and Founder
Bob Larrivee Consultancy
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  1. more than a month ago
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My favorite topic.

First let me start with some semantics: there are roughly two types of change processes. Change Management and Management of Change. You can see these as the Yin and the Yang. The change management process in my opinion relates to the "soft" side of change (behavior, culture, mindset) while the Management of Change relates to the "hard" part being processes, procedures, systems (everything you can basically write down). In case of major changes, you need to cover both. If you only cover the soft side, you will have changed peoples minds about a process or system that hasn't changed and if you only do the management of change (which I will call MoC from now on) then you have a changed process or system without many people knowing aboiut it.

I will assume that the question on change management actually refers to the Management of Change side.

My answer is: YES, managing change definitely is a process, I would even dare to go as far to state that this is one of THE most important processes any organization has. The reason for this bold statement is that once you have a stable and complete set of documentation on systems, applications and processes, you need to make sure they stay up to date and this is the sole purpose of the MoC process.

The process shoiuld also always span both the systems/applications world and the process world (which are very often two separate worlds in an organization) in order to maintain the alignment between the processes and the supporting applications (and underlying architecture).

Check the link for a number of posts I've done on this very subject over the course of the last 2-3 years...
References
  1. https://www.linkedin.com/in/casparjans/detail/recent-activity/posts/
BPM is all about mindset first and toolset later....much later
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  1. more than a month ago
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Change management is coordination of work thus it is just another process. However, the level of coordination may be vary in different change management processes. In some areas, such coordination is rather loose, in other areas it must be very rigorous.

For example, corporate security strongly depends on change management processes, because corporate security follows the “weak chain link” principle which is in other words “the level of system security is the level of the most unsecury element of the system”.

Thanks,
AS
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  1. more than a month ago
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Everything is a process! It is just a question of context and perspective. Nice work setting the context Caspar. Both aspects are processes and yes Peter you must bring process discipline in to be more successful in CM. Process -> a series of actions or steps to in order to achieve outcome. In today's world, and as you said the 'change is coming faster', we have to balance how much 'structure' we employ to achieve the outcome but some structure needs to be in place. CM should always be looked at as a process. Otherwise there is no mechanism to corral folks and organizations to shift. I believe that CM is one of the top 5 reasons for BPM/DPA implementation failure. Many organizations fail to recognize that behavior, culture, mindset (Caspar's words) are not flipped with a switch. Organizations just plop in technology solutions and think everybody is off and running. However, going back to the original question I am interested more in how change management is getting faster in DPA deployments thru UX design, deploying agile techniques in the rollouts, employing end users more in the up front design of the organizational change and how technology development is being put more in the hands of the end user.
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  1. more than a month ago
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Handling change is not just a process, it is probably the best opportunity for BPM to become a strategic c-suite issue. Today companies are organised for sameness. Change is an occasional disruptive event that we handle as a project. Organising for a world of continual change is a major undertaking. BPM has to play a critical role in communicating how work is done. Today much of this information rests in the heads of the people who do the work. Until now there has been little need to formalise it. Unfortunately many of today's BPM tools are poorly equipped to deal with change and do not communicate well with the general workforce or executive management. There is work to be done..
Comment
  1. Caspar Jans
  2. 7 months ago
  3. #5927
Wonderfully said, Anthony. Coiuld not agree more.
  1. more than a month ago
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I Googled "project" vs "process" and the definitions are all over the place - no wonder the postings here are similarly all over the place.

I see no hope - mention either word and you are likely to get head-tilts.

Remedy: When someone mentions that they are doing "work", check out what software they are using - If it's CPM, they are managing a project, if it's BPM, they are managing a process.
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  1. more than a month ago
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Agree with Karl! I think change management is really about good interpersonal skills to bring people along with the new business objectives. The likely biggest problem will lie with the required change in the supporting legacy inflexible software which scares most business people as suppliers look forward to yet another expensive project! As we see now the move to outsource infrastructure this could bring interesting consequences that may trigger a rethink on how business wants systems to support the new ways. This could be opportunity for BPM and good supporting platforms?
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 10
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I like the wording Change management e.g. behavior, attitude and mindset vs. Managing change e.g. it system, equipment, organizational arrangement… the key difference here is the people have their own intentions, motivations and experiences which may be very difficult to change from outside skin. Technical systems do not resist change… they do what we plan or design them to do.

Wording process refers input, action output. in typical BPM we know what needs to be done in grate detail e.g. repetitive routine work with known inputs and defined outputs… of course some variation occurs here. In the case of change we do not know what works or does not work in advance. Here the variation depends on how big change we might try to achieve… certainly this is no routine work and success is never for sure. Normal organization do typically manage cultural changes very badly… mostly the results are failure and frustration… loss of business, profit and growth.

Br. Kai
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  1. more than a month ago
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Why change management? If management and executive leadership is about ... direction, strategy, choices, decisions ... are these terms not synonymous with "change"? What is management doing if it is not managing change? Change-in-the-small (iterations for process improvement) or change-in-the-large (new services, products, strategies). What is gained by calling out "change management" that is not just "that's your job"?
Comment
Sure, everything is "change management", same as everything is "a process" (including once-through projects which are not processes per se).

C-Suite execs do not like to put out the impression that they actively promote "change" - the reason is people resist change. Getting staff on the bandwagon for a "new innovative product or service" is easier.

Of course, any set of terms that gets repeated enough tends to become part of the vocabulary. We adapted to "alternative facts", now as of today we are being introduced to "planned emergencies"
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