BPM.com
  1. Peter Schooff
  2. Sherlock Holmes
  3. BPM Discussions
  4. Tuesday, 16 October 2018
  5.  Subscribe via email
Robotic Process Automation is still being hyped everywhere, so are companies getting what they expect from RPA, or are they in for a trough of disillusionment?
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
I initially didn't understand the hype around RPA. It sounded like a macro/screen recording tool on steroids. But the more I've learned about it the more compelling it becomes. For instance, the idea of using AI for "process discovery" or monitoring onscreen actions in a group of call center agents to identify patterns and then automate them would seem to be a pretty powerful concept. But to answer your question, I don't think RPA has lived up to the hype yet. However, I believe it is picking up steam and, in the right situations, it's going to prove invaluable for businesses.
Going with the Flow at Integrifyintegrify.com
Comment
  1. Emiel Kelly
  2. 2 months ago
  3. #5751
using AI for "process discovery" -> Isn't that wat process mining tools have been doing for 15 years?
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 1
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) has always been a problem in computing. From immemorial times, attempts were made to introduce protocols and tools to make it simpler. Even Web Services, the current standard, and technically very accepted, but quite complex to implement.

Robotic Process Automation began as an alternative to all this. At first, it was technically inelegant. It has gradually found its place. And in certain niches, it has become an enormous value-added solution.

In short, I don't think RPA has reached its limit. It could be adopted by many organizations yet. Together and complimentary, RPA + Cloud BPM will continue to grow.

Regards,
CEO at Flokzu Cloud BPM Suite
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 2
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
RPA hasn't even really taken off, if you ask me. I see it being applied cautiously left and right, but no mainstream application yet, certainly not the "next BPM" (which is disturbing on so many levels).

I also think RPA is inflated with regard to its importance. Yes, it can help companies perform tasks in an automated way (for instance like scraping currency exchange rates from the internet for the Controlling department to be able to properly hedge some FX risks), and yes, it can potentially take over tasks from humans.

But at the end of the day, RPA is nothing more and nothing less than an IT system supporting a part of a business process.

So, extremely hyped, in for a ride thru the through of disappointment but I'm convinced it will find a structural place in the BPM tool set in the near future.
BPM is all about mindset first and toolset later....much later
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 3
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
It seems that the benefits of robotic process automation have been overstated in many cases, for which adjustment periods are surely taking place. We have encountered several companies realizing that the full potential of process automation won't stem from bots alone but rather from a "process automation mix" that, besides RPA, may include BPM (foremost), ACM, ECM and, of course, BRE for the business benefits to be harnessed to their fullest.
One of the key factors of many enterprises becoming interested and also very successful in applying RPA, in my opinion, is its easy and intuitive use for solving complex automation and integration challenges. In that sense, I agree that there still is a huge potential for growth, concerning RPA itself, but more importantly, as a role model for BPM (and others) to follow. Acknowledging that an intuitive and none-coding approach doesn't equal simple and limited, 100 mile distanced approximations of a true solution, it should become apparent that RPA's ease of implementation is something to be emulated and the technology itself be leveraged by existing platforms and frameworks.
NSI Soluciones - ABPMP PTY
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 4
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
RPA definitely provides a bundle of opportunities to address operational/manual overheads & mundane transaction. Having said that, some of the adoptions and noise is mostly centered around enabling "virtual integration" across discrete systems/tech stacks - to be precise a tactical approach to the problem.

There are multiple discussions around RPA as an initial stage for automation journey and followed by more intelligent and cognitive way of implementation (self-serviceability or self-healing process as the nirvana state). On a practical note - if an organization has invested on RPA, i.e. building virtual integration wrapper between systems to meet the business functionality it is pretty similar to a tactical fix. And if any one of the connecting system gets transformed or upgraded the RPA component will get impacted. This raises some doubts from a strategic vision standpoint

To summarize:
RPA has been instrumental in achieving quick gains and faster turn-around-time for enterprises that were getting locked with legacy/COTS and other enterprise products in the landscape and limited scope for integration/data exchange. RPA gave Wings to the enterprise to fly back & forth between discrete systems (keeping aside the technology, transformation journey and roadmap barrier which incurs a lot of dollar & time)

Once the initial speed-breaker is covered with RPA, the next step in the automation journey will be critical and taxing as it will demand for a strategic move ripping off the wrapper stickers (RPA jobs in place) and heal the systems and stitch it together ensuring all the stacks are upgraded to the best in class technology and optimized to Scale

Cost of RPA setup & duration of adoption/usage to reap benefits in terms of cost/time/opex vs Cost /Time to do a complete transformation/modernization of the stacks/legacy/COTS product defines the fate/life-cycle of the RPA in the Enterprise
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 5
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
I like the Deloitte definition - almost understandable by business even if as a tag RPA is a somewhat "exaggerated" term. But that is typical of the IT industry linked to the usual over hype. The capabilities are very important to support users with real-time interactions. Indeed an essential need as the focus goes to "digital" supporting business users. However really should be a capability integral to any Digital Business Platform "DBP" which should be supported by a good business driven architecture to remove need to code to deliver.

I find it difficult to vision just "RPA" as a tool that is going to deliver the end to end solution. Again an industry problem with so many "components" including custom coding needed to deliver it is perhaps no real surprise the RPA hype leads to such disillusionment? As such providing that complete "Platform" to support the BPM discipline is likely the way forward for business to truly dictate what they really want and automatically providing that vital data and links to support users as required?
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 6
  • Page :
  • 1


There are no replies made for this post yet.
However, you are not allowed to reply to this post.