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From Boris Zinchenko: How do you think the culture of an organization should impact the choice of BPM technology?
Max Young
Blog Writer
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Organizations that want to adopt BPM are like people or focus on fitness regime.

If you already inclined to it, it will seem like a natural movement, and it will fit very organically.

If you’re not used to it, it can change your life for the better.

But either way, if you don’t put in the work, you won’t get the results.

Net/Net, regardless of your culture, you need to move towards the culture of the BPM, just as you need to towards North, regardless of starting from the East or the South.
References
  1. http://www.capbpm.com
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 1
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
As I already mentioned several times – the use of all potentials of any BPM technology requires a serious transformation of “classic” organisations on how they select, architect, build, deploy, support and maintain solutions (i.e. concerned to biz people and techies).

Thus, consider the ability of the culture of your organisation to carry out such a transformation as the most important factor in your selection of BPM technology.

Thanks,
AS
Comment
  1. Max Young
  2. 10 months ago
  3. #4972
Does it necessarily? If the adoption is low risk, doesn’t *any* movement constitute a good thing?

To keep with my previous anology, if the patient is unfit, doesn’t some form of healthy habit, no matter how incomplete, constitute a win?
Any "good thing" has an associated cost. Ability of the culture to carry out necessary changes strongly affects ROI (which is an integral part of any BPM project).
As Alexander points out, any change has an associated cost and has to be considered against Max's risk. (low risk/ low cost -> high risk/high cost)

A pilot run of "low risk/low cost" that fails is a "bad" thing in that it can hobble future good use of BPM.
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 2
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
This is very big question. It is not very clear what we mean by culture... maybe the most obvious definition the culture is the we act and behave in the organization. But there are always drivers behind action and behavior such as norms, believes, relationships, past success and failure, personalities especially how the leaders deal with the people and so on... and of course the business situation, the nature if the competition or how standardized vs. artful the work is.

Here are some aspects:

1. The first conclusion might be that there is no BPM approach to fit for every organization. Every organization has to learn to use and benefit the BPM it's own way... a good image of this can be found from Peter Senge Learning organization concept.

2. The BPM as a management approach is a mental exercise. The more standardized (such as industrial or consumer service) the work is, the easier it might be to take the BPM in use. In many cases there is available easy to understand route towards automation and digitalization to improve efficiency, quality, customer experience and effectiveness. This is at the moment changing because of the AI, which will affect also artful work (such as expert services, education and some area of health care)

3. Very important cultural aspect is how leaders deal with the people. E.g. if leaders focus only to the (economical) results and high level strategies, there is not much room for BPM. If the leaders focus only to the people and in worst case they think that the people are consumables, no room for BPM. If leaders feel that they have all the wisdom and (decision) power and the rest of organization is there for execution, no room for BPM. If the leaders are not ready for dialogue, transparency and learning process, no room for BPM. BPM is a system approach to improve the business system.

br. Kai
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 3
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
It seems there are two types of workers, one that likes to organize their own work with the other preferring that work be organized for them.

Example; In healthcare services delivery (well - established protocols, reflecting individual hospital policy & procedure) workers welcome orchestration in terms of task scheduling/prioritization, except at the clinical intervention level where, doctors, at least, can have quite different ways of dealing with patients with the same cluster of symptoms.

In law enforcement investigations, (here, best practice protocols serve as guidelines, the actual work requires a connect-the-dots approach) investigators strongly resist "big brother" and want no orchestration at all re Cases overall. However, they welcome governance in the form of rules that point out precedence violations and they do not complain about strong orchestration regarding the collection and handling of evidence as failure to follow protocol usually results in evidence being thrown out of court.

Seems that culture can evolve as a result of ownership preferences (i.e. this is the way we do things here) or it evolves naturally from the nature of the work. Once set, the culture solidifies as prospective workers gravitate toward work and organizations that allow them to work the way they want/like.
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 4
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Generally I find that the more the culture resists BPM, the more the organization probably needs it.

Just think about the magnitude of cognitive dissonance some of these companies experience upon exposure to BPM. Are you trying to tell me that the millions we spend on development each year might be a bad idea? and What do you mean, my SDLC is killing my responsiveness (and therefore my company)?

All beginnings are hard. Why do people resist change? Because, more often than not, the change implies a flaw in the way you were doing something before, a flaw you weren't aware of and are reluctant to acknowledge.

A culture that embraces change, one that is never satisfied with the status quo, will readily embrace the value of low-code/no-code BPM platforms. But organizations like that are ahead of the game already. The sticks-in-the-mud need BPM just to catch up—but they may be slow to accept it.
http://www.bplogix.com/images/icon-x-medium.png
-Scott
Comment

My observation is that stick-in-the-mud organizations present a greater challenge than stick-in-the-mud employees.

If you make the transition partially subjective (join or do not join) and the UI/processing has been done right, some will resist for no apparent good reason at all whereas others onboard enthusiastically.

As the resisters observe that those who get onboard have an easier time doing their work, the resisters will slowly break rank.

We had one client where we were warned in advance that there would be a high level of resistance.

The "solution" was to set up one "pilot" user in a "keep-out" area. Within one day, staff started asking why all of the secrecy and the only explanation given was the person was trying out a new system.

Within a few hours, a delegation came forward demanding that they too be allowed to try out the new system.
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 5
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Great question. The first thing to look at, would be how one would defines the organizational culture. That may include hierarchical structures (including: how does the company typical decides on critical issues), technical and operational readiness for tangible changes a BPM optimized process could entail, the willingness to act upon process weaknesses unearthed during analysis and simulation efforts, among many other variables that should influence the process tech of choice.
Looking at the business culture in such a detailed way, allows for a very viable filter which should make it easier to pick an adequate BPMS or comparable technologies that fits the company's ambitions as well as its means (and not only in a monetary sense).
All to often have we witnessed a small organization acquiring a mammoth iBPMS, while completely ignoring the fact that its entire IT department only consists of only 15 people and most of its business is derived from knowledge worker intensive, low volume processes.
NSI Soluciones - ABPMP PTY
Comment
:-) we deliver BPM to companies that have usually 1 or 2 headcount in the IT department :-)
  1. Kay Winkler
  2. 10 months ago
  3. #4980
Then your technology and or solution you help the customer to identify, surely fits their business culture. And that, I think, is the point of the exercise of mapping the business culture with the right (sized) BPM approach.
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 6
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
The more established the culture is, the more expensive the BPM implementation will be :)
CEO, Co-founder, Profluo
Comment
  1. Kay Winkler
  2. 10 months ago
  3. #4981
That's actually a very interesting point to which I agree to a large extend. However the "culture-expense-curve" will be leveling out again, after a certain point, I believe. So, being low at the beginning (simple, relatively cheap, off the shelf solution), high in the middle (overshooting on the BPMS specs vs. capacities) and lowering again later on, when the company gets to terms with it's SWOT.
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 7
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
A couple of aspects to this. First the enlightened management recognising advantages of true empowerment of employees can bring significant business benefits will welcome the implementation of BPM supporting software putting power of development into hands of business. As opposed to that the command and control management who have yet to be educated that there is now a new way to work and challenge the old IT model will resist? Another challenge is that build and management of these new BPM supporting systems will significantly reduce the internal IT empires and whilst the brave will take this on with knowledge of "how" many may not take the risk! However with the build up of the pressure for the variety of compliance needs linked with digital pressures will "encourage" investigation into how best delivered which should open the BPM door...?
Comment
@David . . . is there agreement at this forum that there are two groups of employees that need to be "empowered" ?

1) operations level staff focusing on mapping out workflows and getting these to the template stage in a run-time platform

2) the "users" who go to the platform and rely on the run-time environment and background BPM for orchestration and governance for the efficient performance of their daily work.

The way to empower #1 is to via easy mapping, low code, minor reliance on IT etc
The way to empower #2 is via a platform/User Interface where managing one's work at the platform is easier than to resist onboarding

We cannot say it is more important to cater to the needs of either, the organization must succeed in both areas of focus i.e. no point achieving efficient rollout if folks will not use the platform/templates, 3-tier scheduling.
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 8
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