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  1. Peter Schooff
  2. Sherlock Holmes
  3. BPM Discussions
  4. Tuesday, 21 November 2017
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It's that time of year again to look at the year ahead. So what are your BPM predictions for 2018?
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Organizations will be doing it. Everyone will have a different view on it. And we will discuss it here.

You see, I don't take any risks in my predictions.
Sharing my adventures in Process World via Procesje.nl
Comment
  1. Ian Gotts
  2. 1 year ago
  3. #4797
and add, And we will not all agree. And that will be OK.
  1. Emiel Kelly
  2. 1 year ago
  3. #4799
All agree. That would be very boring ;-)
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 1
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
A lot of organizations have already reached "level 1" of BPM over the past years. Few have reached "level 2", but many seem to be eager to get there in 2018.

Level 1: Process as a viewpoint or artefact
These organizations have adopted a "process view" as a way to reach a shared understanding of their business, as a tool for process improvement and/or as a tool to define or drive system behavior.

Level 2: Process as part of the organization's DNA
These organizations have adopted "process" as part of how they structure and manage their business. Process owners that are truly empowered. An outcome-oriented culture and consistent tracking of key process indicators. An organization that continuously reinvents itself along processes.

Just look at who is driving BPM within your company - this is a good indicator which level you are currently on. You can reach great initial successes on level 1, for sure. But only if top management embraces BPM, you will be able to move to level 2.
Co-founder & CEO of Signavio
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  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 2
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
I like this exercise :)
My free, not so meditated, predictions for 2018:


  • Merge and Acquisitions in the BPM Vendors field, specially bigger ones trying to get into the cloud by acquiring smaller startups. We have already seen this in the On-Premise BPM field a few years ago.
  • IFTTT still gaining momentum will cross the line to BPM Suites. This is not a happy thing to happen, but I think that tools like Zapier will continue growing, and one growing direction could be incorporating features traditionally exclusive from BPM Suites.
  • More BPM adoption by SMB's (SME's), specially cloud BPM Suites. We have seen it happen this year, and I expect the trending will continue on 2018, given the technology is mature and known as a growing and competitive instrument.
  • More AI and Data Analysis tools integrated to business process over the cloud. Forget about on-premise web services. Think about integrating cloud AI and Data services as black boxes, into your business processes over the cloud.


Best !
CEO at Flokzu Cloud BPM Suite
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 3
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
That here, like elsewhere, like every year, no one will really keep track of these annual predictions, much less hold individuals or parties are held to account on their bloviation.

Same schtuff, different year.

Move on folks, nothing to see here.

Happy Turkey Day for us Merkins.
Comment
It's the total lack of accountability that makes it fun.
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 4
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Predictions? Sure.


  1. The recently-released Gartner iBPMS MQ will be their last. The “software monolith” approach to problem solving is (finally) starting to collapse under its own weight.
  2. The tension between the DIY types who want quick-and-dirty automation for small workgroup processes, and bigger-picture folks who seek to build customer-facing or medium- to large-scale solutions will cause more fragmentation in the BPM market. (We've seen this before, or course: think Access database vs. SQL Server.)
  3. We'll all be spending even less time (if that's possible) at large conferences. While we'll probably continue to participate in the webinars and other online events that have largely supplanted the big meetings, I anticipate (and, frankly, hope to see) new interest in smaller, more intimate in-person conferences. bpmNEXT is a great example of such a conference.


Then again, I could be wrong.

May your turkeys be juicy and your favorite teams victorious this Thanksgiving.
http://www.bplogix.com/images/icon-x-medium.png
-Scott
Comment
Dear Santa, please, "make" Sccott be right with the item 1.
  1. John Morris
  2. 1 year ago
  3. #4806
+1 Dr. Samarin should get his Xmas wish. Let BPM be BPM.
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 5
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Same as, same as.

Given the usual gap between the introduction of inventions and adoption, a one-year timeframe will not move the dial.

However, nothing to prevent BPM (the methodology) from racking up very significant advances, with adoption by a small number of forward-looking customers.

My agenda is to get to where outcomes of homicide crime scene investigations being managed in an ACM/BPM run-time environment can be improved - currently, lack of adherence to protocol results in evidence being tossed aside. One error/omission in a set of 150 investigative steps can ruin an investigation.

Another same level of importance initiative is to achieve full transparency between Kbases (hierarchical, free-form-search environments) and ACM/BPM Cases. where the data is in RDBMS records. This will open many doors.

Thirdly, get real-time predictive analytics working at branching decision boxes in BPM flowgraphs.
References
  1. https://kwkeirstead.wordpress.com/
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  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 6
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
BPM methodology or process based applications in general will have an interesting role to play as once cutting-edge technologies are becoming more mainstream.

By example with the democratization of AI technology, we will see interesting use cases where business application integrates AI features to anticipate the outcome of their processes and suggest changes to end users or automatically apply those changes to optimize the business.

Also, as we saw this past year, BPM brings the discipline in the design of application required to help with the deployment of Blockchain application. I’m looking forward for a decentralized application that is orchestrated by processes!
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  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 7
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
BPM future is bright as the "software monolith" starts to collapse. How this will happen is the key and frankly long overdue. Enterprise software has failed to evolve to reflect the reality that business is actually quite simple. The rise of the need to digitize front line operational processes plays straight into the BPM thinking and now emerging is the supporting software that delivers direct from user needs and with no or low code. The world is changing and new technologies will be promoted to solve many issues to the betterment of the many....not the few. Enterprise software is just one industry that needs to make a step change to reduce the huge costs of legacy and focus on supporting people at work with empowerment and increase in productivity. I do not underestimate the challenge as the existing supply chain never mind the few big vendors will take a big hit but customers will be the real winners. Will it be next year.....? Yes it will be the start of a new journey
Comment
  1. Ian Gotts
  2. 1 year ago
  3. #4809
True. But the app vendors, not the BPM vendors, will benefit.
It's the customer that will be the real winner with those with BPM skills to help build next generation enterprise software without need for coders. App vendors sure but how they build to deliver Adaptive UIs and applications will need to be transparent; any lock in will be scrutinised?

@David.. . . . I would submit that next-generation enterprise software should reasonably be built by those who are enterprise architects, not people with BPM skills. Architects with BPM skills, a winning combination of skill sets.!

My perception is most BPM specialists believe the job is complete with the publication of a BPM flowgraph. Facts are the job is less than 1/2 done.

A smaller subset understands that flowgraphs must be capable of being compiled by software to generate run-time BPM template instances capable of being hosted in a run-time workflow/workload management environment (i.e. platform). Absent a compiler, users are left with the option of staring at pictures of workflows.

The real challenge is specification and building of runtime platforms capable of hosting ALL work (structured/unstructured work; work performed at the platform/work performed at local or remote systems and applications). This immediately indicates a requirement to have a bi-directional directional data exchanger so that what is commonly called a BPMs providing guidelines and guardrails in the background of the runtime platform does not become an island.

Essential add-ons include
a) three-tier scheduling of tasks (people, machines, software with resource allocation, leveling and balancing or RALB);
b) the ability to set objectives at Cases and non-subjective means of assessing progress toward objectives.
c) a formal Case History where all activity gets appended with a system/level date timestamp and user signature.

Funny how no one has made any blockchain predictions?

What good is either Case History where the buy transaction in the buyer's Case History does not map the seller's transaction in the seller's Case History?
@Ian - it depends on the market segment.
Small companies are fine with one-app-per-major-process, because they have few.
Mid-sized companies don't have the energy to integrate work across 30 SaaS apps.
Large companies buy anyway all the crap in the world.
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 8
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
More a hope than a prediction - I really "hope" DMN will become a formal, more integral part of many BPMS.
On that note, I do hope the same to become true for industry process KPI bench-marking.
Low code and no-code will increase its presence, offerings and flavors in the world of BPM - as will end-end cloud offerings.
NSI Soluciones - ABPMP PTY
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 9
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Same prediction as the last 10 years - next year will be the year BPM explodes. And that prediction will be wrong again. But it will keep BPM vendors hopes alive and they will keep adding features, spending marketing dollars, and getting moderate growth. Whilst the big app vendors give "just about good enough BPM" away as "part of the platform".

Sorry, to piss on everyone's strawberries, but a pessimist is what an optimist calls a realist.
Comment
Vendors who embed BPM in their workload/workflow platforms hobble themselves - each time they want to roll out improvements to their BPM "module" they have to compile and make available a new release of the entire platform.

Silly and expensive.!
  1. Ian Gotts
  2. 1 year ago
  3. #4817
SaaS companies deploy multiple times per year, so not an issue. Plus they don't need to roll-out many improvements as the power is being part of the platform. Take Salesforce - their BPM capabilities are pretty limited, but they still are leaders in a number of BPM MQ
@Karl, we do CI/CD - no problem pushing continuous upgrades to all of our customers, regardless of their customizations.
I believe @Ian is right. Good enough BPM should warrant very good success.
I think I said this last year (or two years ago?) - going back to basics will do this industry a lot of good.
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 10
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
@Karl
The skills required to build these next generation applications are more about interpersonal communications to encourage people into open dialogue about how they work and extracting new ideas. The technical skills are easily acquired in days and may well be former architects even coders!
Your bi-directional and essential add-ons should be handled in the supporting software platforms. Hence the need for proper research on how this is delivered before you start a project......?
As for blockchain whilst very focused on ledger banking transactions there will be a need to have full accountability on supporting processes and BPM has a role.
You are right change is important and inbuilt to any platform the management of change important with no code generation or compiling this is where declarative technique delivers.....quick and cheap!
Comment


Thanks, David

My comment was about "enterprise software (ie. platforms) whereas you are talking about "applications" - two very different animals.

Re "bi-directional directional data exchanger" - this really has to be an external standalone module owned by none of the publishing/subscribing trading partners.

Bi-directional export/\import facilities can and should "be handled in the... software platforms" but "the" data exchanger needs to be a standalone module (parked at a physically separate/isolated server for security reasons).

You end up with an e-hub, with potentially hundreds/thousands of trading partners, where each data exchange partner wants to be able to post and read "messages" at their individual desired frequencies (i.e. some every 5 mins, some once a week) and, most importantly, using their own individual data element names.

Example: If one partner publishes 'shipping_address" under the data element name "saddr" and there are two subscribers, the 1st might want to read that as "ShipAdress" and the 2nd as "primary_shipping_address".

If subscriber #2 now wants to enrich/edit "primary_shipping_address" and post that back to the exchange (i.e. subscriber #2 now assumes the role of publisher,) the "saddr" subscriber needs to be able to read 'primary_shipping_address" as "saddr" and subscriber #1 needs to be able to read "primary_shipping_address" as "ShipAddress".

The overriding consideration for the importance of "free-standing e-hub data exchangers" is that publishers typically want to only share data on a need-to-know basis - the e-hub takes care of this.

The reason we took close to a year to develop an e-hub data exchanger was that we had a Managed Care Company with 100 member clinics, 50 member hospitals/l\abs and a "panel" of some 1,000 specialist healthcare organizations. The MCO wanted each care provider to have the most recent service records in their individual Charts at the time of a patient visit.

The "standard" format for healthcare included 11,000 data points, 99 pct of which would be empty or have no meaning for any one trading partner so we wisely, in my view, decided not to carry out the data exchange using the "standard".
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 11
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Agree data exchange vital and controlled to ensure only those authorised gain access. This is only one important element of our platform handled in a variety of ways including inbuilt server side message queue, enterprise service bus, tag library and aided by in memory work capability. You raise good point about security as all data needs to be protected and accountability now being promoted by GDPR compliance! This could be another driver on the need to think BPM?

Picked up you comment on twitter on this https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=share&v=Zv5rwm4TYzU
Very interesting clearly BPMN not up to job but is all about medical processes requiring quite complex support. Looks like using Australian developed YAWL Yet Another Workflow Language. They certainly using our language but well over a decade after us! Just highlights the capabilities next generation software platforms needs to support!
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 12
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
My prediction is that "agility" in many different forms such as Lean, Scrum, Resilience, adaptability, fast company, experiments, rapid results, responsiveness, Lean start-up... will be hot topic. In software industry we need platforms enabling apps/services for different purposes integrating themselves into the flow of business and processes. In social dimension this means more decentralized decision making, self organizing, transparency, incentives supporting calculated risk taking in small scale, shared purpose and values...

The more complex the business environment becomes, the more strategic for business to survive the "agility" will become.
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  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 13
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
In 2018, BPM is the how, not the what.
There is no spoon.
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  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 14
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
[DISCLAIMER: This review is recycled from last year. But expanded and updated!]

My prediction for the fate of BPM automation technology in 2018 is again that change will be a "game-of-inches", a game especially depending on master data management (and associated integration issues including APIs), process governance, and BPM engine limitations. A game of inches does not mean failure though; it can be steady progress.

How will that progress come? Concerning enthusiasm in many quarters for agile and situational BPM applications and democratic BPM etc. etc., I'm not optimistic. There are skill issues, governance issues and technical issues. And most of all there are scale issues which multiply all the above. Under normal circumstances, where change is concerned you can't have too many issues.

There is hope however for BPM software technology in 2018. And that hope comes via business development and sales -- even with the game of inches.

That hope is defined by the possibility that BPM technology adoption is probably a chaotic system. Adoption chaos starts with the complexity of BPM software technology itself, because according to Gartner, BPM consists of up to 40 related technologies, starting from BPM core technology, but adding from there tooling and integration, non-core BPM, BPM complementary and BPM patterns. And completing the other side of the BPM adoption chaos model, we find use cases and business cases. And governance. And investment climates.

I have claimed that BPM software technology is THE technology of work.. Superficially it's easy to claim therefore that if BPM is so important, that "this should be the year of BPM". But one can't draw the line so easily, and in fact the difficulty of tying the centrality of business process to an associated technology probably contributes in some way to the unpredictability of BPM adoption.

So, it's not predicable where BPM software technology adoption might ramp up, whether by vertical or horizontal market, or by vendors, or with specific sub-technologies; there are too many degrees of freedom. That said however, "freedom" (O.K. freedom loosely defined) means that any given actor in the BPM ecosystem can succeed -- and in part due to intelligent effort to spread the good news of BPM. Adoption paths exist and can be discovered. Luck + informed effort = positive outcome. Sell the power!
Comment
"A game of inches does not mean failure though"
*biting hand*
  1. John Morris
  2. 1 year ago
  3. #4823
LOL +1 @Bogdan. Let's apply "inches" just to markets!

Individual deals and programmes can be won though, per my point. You can find the path because the fundamentals are there. It's just that no one should rely on "a high tide lifting all boats" year-of-BPM fantasy. It's well--targeted but individual biz dev and sales engagements that can be won. Does this resonate with you?
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 15
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
In 2018 companies will continue to expand their view of BPM as an instrument for reducing costs and increasing efficiency to an enabler for better customer engagement and innovation. One of the key drivers for adoption will be the digital transformation and the emerging need to provide digital products and services across industries
Kritika Pandey (Software Analyst)
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 16
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
In 2018, the following 4 trends are the ones that will keep buzzing around the BPM vendors, enthusiasts and process experts:

Trend #1

Bots Enter Process Automation

Trend #2

Adaptive Case Management

Trend #3

A Spike in Demand for Low-Code Systems

Trend #4

Increased Collaboration in the Workforce

Viewpoints are welcome. :)
References
  1. https://kissflow.com/bpm/4-trends-revolutionizing-business-process-management-2018/
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 17
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