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  4. Tuesday, 17 October 2017
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Last week's discussion, Will Processes Be Less Important in the Digital Era? clearly established that processes will be as necessary as ever in the digital era. So do you think it's necessary that a company does BPM before they go digital?
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Well yes but first they need to understand what BPM is.....and then understand how the supporting software in a Digital Business Platform actually works to delivery a digital service. The learning experiences are intrinsically linked being aware of that is a good start?
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  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 1
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A company that doesn't do BPM* is a company that doesn't exist, so it is inevitable.


*Although I do know companies that are not so good at it.
Sharing my adventures in Process World via Procesje.nl
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 2
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Doing BPM (discipline, tools and practice) correctly is the best way to go digital.

Thanks,
AS
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 3
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How about a refined definition of "going digital" first?

http://www.zdnet.com/article/everyone-is-going-digital-but-just-what-does-that-mean/

Does the set "social, mobile, analytics/big data, consumerization of IT, cloud" work for everyone at this forum question?
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 4
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"Going digital", expressing more a general idea for implementing modern business platforms and solutions than prescribing a defined set of steps to take, BPM, naturally, ought to be an integral part of any such initiative. As should ECM, Business Rules Engines, IoT Apps, Data Digitalization and Transformation (http://www.stonebond.com has a great platform for that) and many other "digital enablers" as well.
For businesses already counting on one or even several BPM Suites, the task at hand would be the identification of opportunities to better leverage existing process assets by improving on the process designs and their features themselves. That in turn may lead to upgrading or completely changing underlying technological components, altogether.
For organizations that have yet to embark on their BPM journey, complementing their "digital strategy" with BPM had never before have so many options - there are literally thousands of BPM vendors and implementers to chose from around the globe, spanning a whole spectrum of different flavors, including everything: from platforms with community licensing to licenses that pretty much costs you a soul or two. From Java to .NET only solutions. From vertical pre-made solutions to platforms for builders. From BPM pure players to vendors that mixed BPM with pretty much anything else that one can think of.
In that sense, times are good to use BPM in order to bolster ones digital plan of attack.
NSI Soluciones - ABPMP PTY
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 5
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A friend of mine used to say "Life is a Workflow". And if life is a workflow, then a company' day is a BPM :)
I agree with Emiel Kelly in this topic and add: if a company wants to be more productive, competitive and grow, it needs to "do BPM" in the correct way. And doing BPM the right way, will naturally let it go digital.
CEO at Flokzu Cloud BPM Suite
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@Juan... Works for me.

If companies decide that doing the right things, the right way, using the right resources (performing resources) is important for them, i.e. "doing BPM", AND they augment this with platforms capable fo supporting workload management and objectives assessments, these companies "will naturally go digital too"

However, there are many ways of putting in place "BPM + workload management + objectives assessments" platforms. Some accommodate higher efficiency/higher effectiveness, so my take is better not to "do BPM" before, or after, but during.
RE ""Life is a Workflow"" - from my blogpost https://improving-bpm-systems.blogspot.ch/2013/06/practical-process-patterns-cxaap.html This blogpost is inspired by the sentence
"The reason customers use our products and services, is to get jobs done in their lives." from http://bridging-the-gap.me/2013/06/03/designing-the-business-around-the-experience/
This sentence made me thinking about a hierarchy of embedded (in some sense) processes:
"person's life-as-a-process",
"person's situation-as-a-process" (e.g. expecting a baby), and
"person's job-as-a-process" (e.g. buying a bigger car for bigger family).
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 6
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Going Digital is essentially a three fold effort:

- Legacy Modernization - Opening back end and big iron systems to make data available to front-end, customer-facing applications
- Integration - Bringing together front-end, middle-tier, back-end, and external systems, data sources, and IoT devices to enable data to flow from update/request to insight/service
- User Experience (UI/UX/CX) - Creating engaging, omnichannel experiences where internal (CSR, claims adjuster) and external (client, partner, broker) can get and receive help (info, pricing, update, change, etc)

BPM enables all three whether directly or through complimentary technology.

With BPM you can create user experiences where users log-in and find/do/track work, collaborate, and run reports. Organizations having UIs in place via portals and in-house apps may also leverage BPM strictly for workflow routing and rules management. BPM drives modernization by integrating through APIs, Widgets, and REST services to enable straight through processing directly to 3rd party systems or via ESBs.

Now that BPM Suites are expanding to include AI, Machine Learning, predictive analytics, and WIX-like configurable interfaces, organizations can rely more heavily on BPM platforms to transform the whole digital experience.
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@Garth Agree this is the opportunity to modernise legacy but as the slave to the new digital capabilities. I see it as wrapping a green field of adaptive applications around the brown field of legacy. Over time much of old inflexible legacy can be retired allowing real empowerment of people with true accountability all of which should contribute to improved productivity and job satisfaction.
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 7
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BPM or Digital do not enter in empty place. Every organization has some BPM and digital. So it is much of question what degree or maturity of PBM or Digital we should have to run the business. Everything of course depends what customers are expecting and competitors are doing. In this forum it is easy to agree that these approaches are vital for survival, but there are also other ways to develop highly successful business such as competence or knowledge management, restructuring the business ecosystem or networking and alliances. Anyway what ever the leading approach to manage the business is, we need somehow deal with the issue "Digital".

In some organizations the "Digital" may be the key competitive advantage and they create strategy and invest in "Digital". My view and as many others here is that BPM enables and helps to deploy digital approaches in a good way. For some other organizations the "Digital" might only be a way to keep the business running with no special importance. BPM has also social dimension enabling collaboration and which does not need to focus so much "Digital"
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 8
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I am confused about mere an action of going digital. Is it one-time event when a company was not digital at all and then instantly became digital? I ve never seen such situation in practice.

Is there any company now, which is not digital altogether? I suppose, not. It is really hard to find a company where nobody has a computer, smartphone or other digital device.

I understand "go digital" in this question more related to global integration initiatives when companies implement large scale IT systems. As such, these initiatives always bear elements of BPM because it is simply impossible to deploy and configure enterprise systems without a clear schema.

IT deployment plans may exist in at least three forms.
1. Simple schemes scratched in standard office packages, such as Visio.
2. Business configuration facilities built into deployed solution, such as in SAP, Oracle and nearly all other major systems.
3. Standalone BPM toolset.

In principle, it does not matter much, which tool is used in every particular case. Modeling an organization in Visio is not at all less professional and efficient than in hi-end BPM packages. In every case, it is definitely better to have a business model in place, even if done in a simple way, than not to have it at all.

In more generic form, question is: should a company do a plan before they go into large administrative imitative? Hardly anybody will answer: no! To name it BPM or not, is a matter of taste.
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@Boris. Agree with "more related to global integration initiatives when companies implement large scale IT systems."

Re " . . it is simply impossible to deploy and configure enterprise systems without a clear schema". Agree as well, but for any "enterprise-wide" undertaking there is a strategic component i.e. what can we do/should we do over the short/medium and long term, given limited resources and more initiatives than can reasonably be taken on?.

Next, in the area of implementation of strategic decisions (i.e. authorizing the undertaking of an initiative), the enterprise needs planning, monitoring, and control.

The planning reasonably requires embracing BPM but the implementation of the initiative needs Critical Path Method (CPM).
@Karl, thank you. Nobody disputes that BPM is the most systematic and beneficial way of going digital and should be done before any implementation of wide IT initiatives in a perfect world. In imperfect world we live, it often happens after or even happens never. But at least a plan is usually in place, which can be seen as a relative BPM surrogate. Although, i knew companies, which didnt care even about minimal planning, which can be seen as an extreme of being disorganized. And what keeps me especially astonished, such companies even somehow manage to survive.
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 9
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Interesting points about Digital even BPM in place....but the point about the now Digital initiative is that it is all about the users being the drivers of creation of new information not the old IT systems? This user drive triggers the need to think BPM to work out what is needed. The new BPM supporting software platforms such as Digital Business Platforms can now quickly build exactly as required direct from user needs without need for custom coding. This must include the "back office" support which can orchestrate all data including legacy and IoT as required ......in real time.

New users interfaces are required replacing legacy ones and custom designed and dynamically presented to authorised users with needed data and ready to easily accept new information/data. This capability will support good user experiences and change readily implemented as required. With the right architecture opportunities for automation, intelligent processes and AI will emerge and readily slot into this adaptive environment.

Adopting this new Digital application environment is going to be fraction of cost of trying to "configure" old systems; sure use as required but orchestrated by this new Digital BPM driven environment.

Just picked up link below on failed Digital projects. Clearly buyers yet again taken for another expensive ride by "old IT"!
References
  1. http://www.computerweekly.com/news/450428441/UK-businesses-losing-half-a-million-pounds-per-cancelled-digital-project?utm_medium=EM&asrc=EM_EDA_84126730&utm_campaign=20171018_UK%20businesses%20losing%20half%20a%20million%20pounds%20per%20cancelled%20digital%20project&utm_source=EDA
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 10
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Great question, but a question that non-BPM people might find laughable. In other words, "ha ha technologists promoting technology -- I have work to do".

Which is to miss the point. And if we can't sell this point, we miss the sale too.

Assume "going digital" means "all-in on automation". And what are we automating? Our work. That's what technology is for.

And there's one technology where the concepts of work are first-class citizens of that technology. That's BPM. BPM is THE technology for automating the work of business.

(Of course there are other essential technologies which are complementary and exclusive of BPM technology: business rules, analytics, UX, database etc. etc.)

Certainly you can automate anything with code. But the fastest and most productive and most empowering way to "go digital" is to use the technology which is all about going digital. If you don't go digital with BPM, all things being equal your projects will cost more and you will almost certainly build less flexible automation artefacts.

The full argument for BPM-as-the-technology-of-the-work-of-business is in my BPM.com series BPM Technology As Revolutionary Enabler
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  1. John Morris
  2. 1 year ago
  3. #4625
TWEET: They #laughed when I said let's use #BPM software! But when we went digital in record time .. http://bit.ly/2gufcHR @BPMdotcom @PSchooff ?
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