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While we discuss processes much more frequently than cases on this forum, do you think case management is more important than process management for a company looking for a competitive advantage in their industry?
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No, both are essential.

Cases need orchestration from background processes (workflow management)

Processes (typically a threaded set of process fragments) need Case (workload management)
References
  1. https://kwkeirstead.wordpress.com/
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@Karl, below I merely re-phrased your excellent answer, which was, hopefully relevant and not exact repetition, although quite close in sense to your statements.
@Boris..My posts need all the help they can get for clarity.

I liked your point re "business objects and processes" - very convenient to be able to park tasks, documents, spreadsheets, images, video/audio recordings in Case Histories where date/timestamps and user 'signatures' are automatically applied and where, once in, no changes can be made. The capability is perhaps a pre-cursor of blockchain.

In law enforcement, we need to accept extreme rigidity (i.e. preserving the 'chain of custody') for some of the work, then totally arbitrary "connect-the-dots" within a Case and often across Cases (convenience store owner is a victim of a blow with a ball peen hammer in one Case, then looking back, there was a similar case 4 years ago, six blocks away). Relational dbms' are no good at this, we do the Case management in a free-form search graphic (hierarchical) knowledgebase.

See Ward Weaver III murder Case (2002) http://www.civerex.com/pages/civmind.html
See Satellite Inventory (7,000 "cases" on one screen) at http://www.civerex.com/pages/civman.html

I want to seamlessly connect nodes in hierarchical kbases to interventions at relational dbms'
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 1
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Customer Service pretty much depends on how well you handle Cases - So it ought to be at the top of the list.
The devil's in the details of the case management system, and how well it aligns with what you really need to support your customers.
Founder at John Reynolds' Venture LLC - Creator of ¿?Trules™ for drama free decisions
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  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 2
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Case is a grouping container for business objects and processes. None is a replacement or an inclusive container for another. Both are equally important for a balanced BPM solution. Well measured combination of case management and process orchestration where either side never overweight another is essential in a successful BPM initiative.
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 3
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In this forum we might have pretty shared view what we mean by BPM. "Case management" may have not such clarity... so first how I define the Case Management: for me it is, how does the organization deal with the "case", being kind of one time execution of the processes (maybe many processes or services). The "case" might be the patient in health care, client in lawsuit, reclamation in service or complicated delivery such as IT-system. For me the processes offer the infrastructure and the case management helps to deal with the complex services for a specific customer. We might also say, that for successful case management we need "case manager" as a role in business process.

In a simple business or service set ups we do not need case management and if the business is small not even process management. When the size and complexity of the business increase the more important the process management is to create competitive advantage... and especially if services are very complex the more important the case management is. The typical cases can be found in health care, social services and financial services.
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 4
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From my point of view, CM is a possible solution that intrinsically stems from BPM. Most of the CM vendors I have seen in that relation, are in fact BPMS vendors that basically combined their tools with custom made processes to provide a case management solution. That usually translates in combining rigid registration and evaluation processes with ad-hoc tasking, in conjunction with the usage of an underlying BPMS, BRE, BI and CMS/ECM, and in rare instances even AI. (Example: IBM Case Management = IBM BPM + FILENET + COGNOS + ODM + SOA) .
In that sense, there is usually isn't a real choice of opting for BPM vs. CM platform to gain a competitive edge, but rather deciding to host vs. not to host a CM solution on top of a BPMS.
NSI Soluciones - ABPMP PTY
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  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 5
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There is not much which is not a Case Management need in business; customers, suppliers, HR, healthcare, asset, project, grant, complaints management etc.....? Every Case need is composed of joined up processes and any DBP should readily build with no/ low code ready to support inevitable change to remain competitive. The Case core is the focus on the receiver of the service requiring clear joined up thinking across traditional silos as required. Once that key data structure established then every process at operational level has this focus and where those detailed changes are implemented to effect that competitive advantage. As such both are equally important?
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 6
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I am with Karl. If a company wants to achieve a competitive advantage then it must know how to use case management and process management together.

Thanks,
AS
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 7
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Let's apply an economics of technology to this question. On this basis, the answer is "yes" -- "case management is more important than process management" for organizations looking to achieve a competitive edge.

Why? Because case management, by definition, will cover the less-commoditized work of the organization. This is the work where the unique differentiation of the organization is important. Margins are higher. And judgement and tacit knowledge are significant aspects of the work. So, if by being competitive, one is winning in the market place, then those wins occur "at the edge", the messy edge of socio-technical systems which is where technology runs out and humans can exercise judgement that has not yet been encoded.

And certainly, case management stands on top of core business processes, especially STP ("straight thru processes) processes. But these are by definition your commodity processes, where margins are lower. There is room in the market for a very small number of best-in-class high volume commodity players. Everyone else has to find a niche. And case management technology is likely (it's possible that differentiation can be achieved in other ways too) part of the enabling technology that enables one to play in a niche.
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With Case you are managing the forest and the trees, whereas with BPM only, you are managing the trees.

Then, we must not forget the four pillars of strategic planning which has the ultimate impact on competitive advantage. (known knowns, known unknowns, unknown knowns, unknown unknowns).

My favorite is "unknown knowns" i.e. the organization knows something, but the folks who are faced with trying to make a decision, right now, don't know where or how to find what the organization knows so the decision gets made on partial knowledge.

Many things besides knowledge and the ability to translate this into information and action (mood, obsessions, beliefs that Mr. Spock would categorize as "illogical", martini lunches, . . . . )

All playing out at CNN daily, hourly. . . .
John, your point has some merit, but I think it's too broad. Take securities trading, for example. In that business, what's important is accuracy, speed of execution, and transparency. Trading works best when it's a straight-through, end-to-end process; and, needless to say, in such companies, that's where the economic value is.
@John. You are of course right there are points in processes in case management where the human capabilities need the freedom to act accordingly. We call them the informal tasks/processes which need to be recognised to allow the outcomes to be recorded. Time may be the only trigger for such recognition where rules can be implemented where there is lack of action...always remember what gets measured gets done! I would add that we must always acknowledge compliance needs!
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 8
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If you don't find yourself needing elements of both, you're probably looking at too narrow a problem set. What's more, if you realize you need both, but you find yourself buying separate modules or even separate products to handle them, then you're not creating the type of integrated, unified applications that keep you competitive.
http://www.bplogix.com/images/icon-x-medium.png
-Scott
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  1. Kay Winkler
  2. 1 year ago
  3. #4573
Indeed!
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 9
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In my view, it is impossible to talk about process management without the focus on case management. The case is a much stronger metaphor to describe the item of work at hand. In the past, automation software vendors equated a work item to a business process. That one to one relationship was an artificial byproduct of technical limitations of process automation suites. It is also the byproduct of many outdated training materials that didn't stay in sync with the rapid pace of advancement of many business process management platforms. So today, you have a situation where the process camp feeds the older, process-centric view of the world. Vendors are pushing advanced Case Management capabilities like DCM/ACM or even more advanced, AI-driven processes. Software vendors usually don’t teach the theory behind work automation with the exception of dry, technically oriented descriptions that are better suited for software developers vs. the business-oriented view of the world.

Several years ago, Forrester put together a slide that contrasted case with the process. This definition was great, but I think it appealed more to enterprise architects than your regular business folks who manage cases on a daily basis through their Excel spreadsheets, applying many manual processes to perform their work.

For a company to achieve a competitive advantage, you need Enterprise/Business Architects who can understand how to blend Case Management, Decision Management, and Process Management disciplines in the context of the practical application of BPMS suites. Today I know of one BPMS vendor, Camunda, who offers modeling tools that blend these three domains as part of their BPMS but they represent a small chunk of the automation market. Many time companies learn about these topics from software vendors in the absence of other sources of information. So software becomes the main source of education, yet vendors usually take the implementation angle to the educational aspect of the theory of work automation. Add workflow/low code disruption to the mix and we could be seeing some interesting enterprise architectures emerging. I can't wait for someone to put together a BPM antipatterns site :D .
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+1 Excellent way to sum up where things are at . . . . "Case Management, Decision Management, and Process Management "
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 10
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As a customer, I shouldn't be able to tell the difference.
As a vendor, I should be able to deliver on this expectation.
Much easier said than done.
CEO, Co-founder, Profluo
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  1. more than a month ago
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