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Suggested by Ian Gotts: How important would you say mobile is to the future of processes?
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Mobile's always been important for real world processes because people are mobile.
What's lacking in many of the current mobile process offerings is the reality of intermittent connectivity. Participants need to be able to continue their process activities while disconnected and seamlessly merge back into the connected process when reconnected.
Founder at John Reynolds' Venture LLC - Creator of ¿?Trules™ for drama free decisions
Comment
that's because most BPM tools are not built with a cloud-first approach... and I'm not talking here about Docker images or responsive websites, but really building resilience with temp saves, front stores, connection error corrections, communication channels orchestrations built into the solution...
well... some tools have been built with that by default ;-) (i.e. any user task is actually a call activity with fairly complex technical processes and activities around the actual interface)
a good, inspiring reference here: http://www.locusmag.com/Perspectives/2015/11/cory-doctorow-the-internet-will-always-suck/
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 1
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Actually, the seamless usage of one or more existing and future channels (web, mobile, API, voice, charbot, robots, etc.) is very important to the future of processes. The main word is "seamless".

Thanks,
AS
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 2
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Very important for any workers who are "on the go"

We have a homicide investigation app for Case Management at crime scenes with one (1) e-command and control laptop, with bi-directional linking to multiple smartphones and tablets.

You cannot expect an investigator at a cell phone to interview a witness and type in verbatim what questions were asked, what responses were given, whereas at a tablet you have a lot more real estate that can accommodate memo fields.

The data collection forms are accordingly different per category of device.

Re tablets, some of these, as we all know, have a stylus which makes things easier [not all LE staff, even today, signed up for "Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing"]. Some of these devices do pen to text.

Forget voice - the last thing an investigator wants is to have media, or witnesses, or suspects hear what the investigator is discussing with any one particular individual.

The network connections need to be adaptable (2 types here as well) - you are not likely to have cell phone coverage in a swamp or in the 3rd sub-basement of an office building, so you need 1) cellular connectivity and a backup 2) portable mobile network.

We had a "Crimes Investigation Management System" (CIMS) back in 2000 but only recently got to where it can be used pretty much everywhere.

Not uncommon to have 500 forms in systems like this being used by "regular users" as well as by "guest users" - we figure we need two (2) categories of log-in as well - we don't want guest users to be able to establish a cursor position at any Case. Guests only log into a portal - the only action they can take is to address tasks that have been pushed out to their portal connection via an engine. The engine is on a different server, it, alone, "talks" to the back end db server.
References
  1. https://kwkeirstead.wordpress.com/
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 3
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When I have to do some intensive work, I still prefer sitting at my desk with a big screen. But when I have to approve some thing, or check some data about the status of a case, I'm very happy with my mobile options.

Talking about BPM; executing (some parts of) processes, monitoring cases status, seeing process performance: mobile works fine.

Doing some design, analysis work; I prefer bigger screens. Which can be a laptop on the beach... should that be called mobile?

So I think the future (or is it present) can be mobile. But that has nothing to do with the technological possibilities, but more with the way organizations manage their processes (and people in it):

Do you trust your people to work anytime, anywhere, anyhow? That's a bigger challenge than implementing some process supporting tooly things that allows people to work mobile.
Sharing my adventures in Process World via Procesje.nl
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 4
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Why is mobile important to the future of BPM? Because human process interaction costs are much lower with mobile.

All things being equal, mobile access to a process UI is "just access". Except better. Mobile access has a much lower latency for the human that wants to get work done. I don't have to "go to my computer" and "boot up the interface" etc. etc. So much of the success of any software technology is dependent on the costs of using that technology. Better UX means lower interaction costs in access time and even thinking costs.

So, mobile is important because mobile process interaction costs are lower. The following short 2008 article by noted UX guru Jakob Nielsen is summarized as "Usage goes down as interaction costs increase. user motivation determines how fast demand drops, following an elasticity curve." (This is an example of how economics can contribute to software design.)

Article: Interaction Elasticity
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great reference, John, thanks!
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 5
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Mobile is so much bigger than "users inputting process data on their mobile devices".
Think fog computing, IoT, machine events, localized contexts (geofences, orientations, movements, proximity events) - they're all very clear process contexts that need to be orchestrated within an inclusive, agnostic, framework.
CEO, Co-founder, Profluo
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 6
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An important UI just like all others! But remember accountability audit trails etc....
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 7
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Mobile is a logical and absolutely important extension for anything BPM. Specifically when it comes to the end-user and the corresponding GUI. In conjunction to what John stated above, good current BPM technologies offer "smart" mobile clients (instead of 0 footprint web clients) that are capable of determining internet connection strengths and allow for limited, temporary local storage processing when on anything below 3G.
A well thought-through form design and process architecture is also key to make a mobile BPM extension work, keeping in mind that not all processes and types of forms are suitable candidates to be "consumed" on the small screen.
For process design, development and administration, though, the old fashioned way of accessing and working via Desktop seems to be still the most viable of the 2 options.
NSI Soluciones - ABPMP PTY
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 8
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Mobile is not a device or a location, but a work style. Work needs follow me from location to location and device device, seamlessly.
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 9
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Most are stuck in old BPM thinking. The digital future and thus the work referred to as a process is collaborative. Staff, partners and customers will be the collaborators. Each one must have the freedom to chose the device freely. The mobile world opens up image, video and voice in a manner that PC or browser can't. It is one of the reasons why old style BPM is on the way out ...
Comment
Old style BPM is on the way out? Looks like these suckers didn't get your memo:
https://www.pehub.com/2017/09/invus-backs-enterprise-software-company-bizagi/

LOL...
  1. John Morris
  2. 1 year ago
  3. #4505
Bravo catch (dated September 13th, 2017!) @Bogdan.
Old BPM thinking?...but BPM has no limitations.... it follows the logic of the way work undertaken and of course recognises new ways to collaborate but there will always be steps that need to be understood and duly recorded. If not chaos, corruption, bad guys win etc. Digitizing with transparency such steps with real time feed back will bring both order and empowerment of people at work and BPM can kick start the right thinking....
@Max states that "work referred to as a process is collaborative'"

In hospitals, a patient can receive 50 services per 24 hour day (some a lot more than this).

Most of the interventions need to be documented. Not via a traditional "audit trail" but via a recording that has a system imposed date/timestamp and caregiver "signature" with the ability to recall data, as it was, at the time it was entered, on the form versions that were in service at the time.

Failure to record can be life-threatening such that formal handoff protocols need to be invoked.

For tasks that are "suspended" (someone starts a task, records some data, then goes off shift without completing the task or putting the task back into the task pool) hospital systems need a "break glass" protocol where almost anyone can get to the task PROVIDING they make voice or other contact with the prior service provider to find out what got done/what did not get done. The intervener has to write up a note and the intervention typically is categorized as an "incident" meriting independent review by the hospital's patient safety committee.
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 10
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True, there is "old" BPM thinking and I suspect there are several "generations" of this, each locked in some time warp.

However, as David says, ". . .but BPM has no limitations", and he is right on this.

Consider a run-time Case Environment where you can do what you like - this includes streaming a patient, or an insurance claim, or a job shop order etc. . . .onto

1) an end-to-end process, OR,
2) a process fragment, OR,
3) a process that consists of one step only, OR,
4) a pure ad hoc intervention where the attached instruction/data collection form has little else on it besides a blank memo field, OR,
5) an inbound message (being an original input from the outside world or a response to a query message dispatched from within the Case environment).

All you need to engage processing at the runtime Case Environment is, for humans, a menu of "available services" and then, secondly, for machines, software, and robots, a generic data exchanger with out-reach and in-reach automation.

For all of the above-listed options (are there any others?), background BPM is providing orchestration and some governance, it is core to the Case environment, every single intervention at the Case is one of type 1-2-3-4-5, hence the affirmation that . . . . BPM has no limitations (within its boundary conditions i.e. operational methodologies and tools).

A mix of 99%/1% ad hoc/structured works, as does 99%/1% structured/ad hoc.
Comment
IMO RBV, free-form-search Kbases, SWOT, and ROI-based funding remain the methodology and tools of choice for strategic planning.
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