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  1. Peter Schooff
  2. Sherlock Holmes
  3. BPM Discussions
  4. Tuesday, 18 July 2017
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As customer service experience is essential to a company's competitive advantage, what are the key ways you've seen processes hinder the CSX?
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
When you see processes as something internal, separated from something like the customer journey

http://procesje.blogspot.nl/2016/10/i-love-it-when-customers-do-all-our-work.html
Sharing my adventures in Process World via Procesje.nl
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  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 1
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Processes hinder the Customer Service Experience whenever they require hand off from one CSR to another.
Sometimes this is inevitable - and when it is particular attention needs to be paid to those handoffs.
Founder at John Reynolds' Venture LLC - Creator of ¿?Trules™ for drama free decisions
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  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 2
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Not enough content integration of customer context.
Not enough empowerment to CSR.
Too little friction in the process of actually understanding the customer and his job-to-do.
CEO, Co-founder, Profluo
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  1. John Morris
  2. 1 year ago
  3. #4242
Hmmmm - what does "too little friction" mean -- I think it means something really important . . .
I know that today's mantra is as little friction as possible. This goes well for mainstream, high-volume crap.
But for super-critical jobs (like building customer empathy and understanding), you need friction. Friction creates wisdom and unique insights.
That's why I'm skeptical of companies' implementations of robotic interactions with customers. These companies are letting a lot of gold pass by them.
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 3
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Processes without an explicit participant CUSTOMER.

Thanks,
AS
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great point, although I have seen a fair number of processes with the Customer as an explicit participant but without explicit activities and motivations. :-)
thus ... "explicit participant CUSTOMER with some activities"
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 4
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Two ways processes can hinder the customer service experience

a) when your processes are unable to accommodate inreach.
b) when your processes are unable to accommodate outreach.

The need for inreach and/or outreach can be 1) contractual 2) pre-emptive/periodic or 3) ad hoc

Some rules for success:

1. No music/news - if there are no reps available, capture the phone # and call back (soon). Give some customers a breakthrough call number (military/law enforcement customers).
2. No chat rooms where ". . . the chat room is not open at this time".
3. No handoffs where the customer has to start all over again with a description of his/her problem or question.

Attribute to look for when hiring CSRs - ". . . immediately, if not sooner"
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  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 5
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Understanding a business process that is actually relevant to the customer service experience as an "end to end" endeavor of the company's value chain, then the biggest impacts to the customer’s perception are indeed usually the elements that are either missing from what is important for the customer or even worse, aimed at the complete opposite direction.
Several things are very obvious and relatively easy to accomplish, avoiding those pitfalls.
For instance, one can make sure that a business process is well integrated into the company's application ecosystem, so that existing information of a prospect or customer automatically populates existing process form fields and that way speeds up any inquiries you may need.
Other challenges are somewhat harder to achieve. Especially in the financial industry you may often encounter automated policy enforcements when dealing with the customer, which, while assuring a better overall product quality on the long run, may occur as damaging to the overall customer experience in the short term. For those circumstances, finding the right balance between exhaustive policy enforcements, while still providing a speedy and optimized business process is key. (Example: Finding a few of the “right” policies to implement into a business process that apply and cover most of the relevant scenarios, instead of dealing with dozens or hundreds of different smaller and even sometimes conflicting policies…)
NSI Soluciones - ABPMP PTY
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  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 6
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
4 X todos to maximize #CustomerExperience success, using #BPM #process tech - #CX #Journey
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Powerful question: How could a business process hinder customer experience? Here are three operational impediments:

1) Poor planning of processes (discussed above) -- e.g. no sense of customer participation or customer journey and especially the COST of participation from the POV of the customer.

2) Poor implementation of processes (discussed above) -- e.g. crummy, awkward BPM, poor data integration, multiple CSR hand-offs, CSR empowerment etc.

3) Poor execution and management of processes (discussed above) -- e.g. adequate staff and training, regular resourcing, spike handling, QA, continuous improvement, management etc.

But there's one more way in which a bad busienss process might undermine customer experience. And that's when management lacks an overall sense and commitment to the idea of joint value creation with customers through business process! The explicit ideas of CX and the larger idea of customer journey are fairly new in management practice. It is somewhat revolutionary to consider that for example an industrial customer is creating value through the use of our products and services - although we note that economists have long studied the idea of "value capture". The idea is of course that total process value is enhanced when the specific value of a product or service is maximized at each stage through an entire life-cycle -- including where customer service is involved. And that sense of "journey" or "narrative" is completely mappable to the idea of process. (I've noted elsewhere how customer journey and BPM are business and technical complements to each other.)

So there's one more answer to the original question. All the impediments to great CX list above are "operational" impediments. Let's list as well the strategic impediment:

4) No strategy that business process technology is the technology of customer experience -- e.g. that BPM is the technology of the work of customer experience, the host for specific UX windows and the backbone of customer journeys. Process is an impediment if it is not considered a central topic of management attention AND that BPM software technology must be the basis of process programmes. This could be described as "process infrastructure" commitment.

With the No. 04 impediment removed (and good commitment to process and process technology in place), then we will be more likely to remove the first three impediments as well.
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 7
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
A few thoughts from customer perspective....

Lack of available history of relationship with customers in verbal exchanges
Poor interactions with choices when interacting on line
Failure to communicate on delays and problems on delivery of the sale
Poor complaints procedure
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  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 8
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Customer service processes are like skating rinks (stay with me here). They need to be frictionless, or you won't have any customers. But they also need to have guardrails, or your customers' experience may be cut short in a way that makes it unlikely they'll ever return.
http://www.bplogix.com/images/icon-x-medium.png
-Scott
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"They need to be frictionless, or you won't have any customers."
I argue that a frictionless customer service process is at least irrelevant, if not dangerous. No customer has ever called support because they wanted the least possible interaction with the company - au contraire...
I have a perfect personal example: years ago, I was trying to use some Google Services and somehow I got my AdWords account banned before even starting to use it. Any attempt to contact customer service resulted in automated FAQ emails from their bots. Absolutely no way around that. To this day, I have no clue what went wrong. From purely technical pov, this was as frictionless as ever. No human contact, almost zero time spent from their side, just a tiny data point in their customer service machine. But it was also completely irrelevant and unhelpful. Maximum efficiency towards zero effectiveness.
The result? Months later, when I chose my cloud stack, I didn't even consider Google Compute Engine. No way I'm leaving my critical business infrastructure in the hands of such "frictionless" support.
Also don't forget that skating requires friction, otherwise there is no traction... right?
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 9
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