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What do you think is a definite sign that a company needs BPM?
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
They want to reduce time-to-market by two times.
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  1. Ian Gotts
  2. 1 year ago
  3. #3921
This is a trick question, right?

Every company needs BPM (approach) to drive up effectiveness and compliance. Not every company needs BPM (standalone technology) as their core "ERP-type" apps provide it.
@Ian, Incredibly relevant observation on distinction between BPM approach and technical implementation (especially automation).
Ok. Let us dispel this trick. Any company is a system. Any system’s architecture is described via several viewpoints (business, technology, implementation, operations, data, etc.). Those architectural viewpoints are different from geometrical viewpoints. Geometrical viewpoints of buildings are viewed side by side — as a composition. Architectural viewpoints are often originated by different people — thus they must be aligned to be used together.
The amount of complexity for propagation a change from more-business viewpoints to more-implementation viewpoints defines the companies time-to-market.
If the company’s more-business viewpoints are based on their own logic (something implicit) and the company’s more-implementation viewpoints are based on their own logic (hidden in your ERP) then the propagation of changes is difficult and the company’s time-to-market is very long.
Now, let us remember that BPM is, actually, a trio of discipline, tools (e.g. BPM-suite) and practice (including patterns, architecture, etc.).
If the company’s more-business viewpoints are based on the BPM-as-a-discipline logic and the company’s more-implementation viewpoints are based on the BPM-suite tool logic then the propagation of changes is simple (of course, if a proper architecture is in place) and the company’s time-to-market is very low.
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 1
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The sign that the company exists.
Sharing my adventures in Process World via Procesje.nl
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...and would like to continue to do so
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 2
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they're in business :)
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...and want to stay that way.
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 3
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Absence of in-line "best practice" protocols, with inconsistent outcomes as the primary symptom.

Secondary indicators (partial list) are:

a) change that does not sustain or does not result in adaptation of processes
b} ROIs/budget allocations that lack quantifiable (other than tracking spending) measures
c) scope/schedule creep

Not so easy to immediately determine, is operational efficiency.
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 4
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When a vendor's sold them a BPMS and they think that's the same thing.
Comment
  1. Emiel Kelly
  2. 1 year ago
  3. #3926
Who is still selling BPMS's these days. Digital Business Platforms are the bomb!
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 5
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I think this is a much deeper question than what it seems.

In my opinion when a company is working fine and don't need to improve its processes, is much a worse scenario, than when the company obviously need BPM. The second scenario is easy, you know they need a BPM Suite when they can't control pending tasks, use lots of paper, people need 2, 3 or 4 windows to update info in several non-integrated systems, can't measure how process are running, and so on. Nothing to discover here.

The interesting thing is how to detect that a company definitely needs BPM when everything is working fine. Because resting in the status quo, comfort zone, is VERY risky (ask blockbuster, taxis, traditional retails stores, and so on). But it is very difficult to convince of the need of a BPM initiative. A few signals that could diagnose that you need to move forward to a BPM initiative:

  • You operating costs are pretty constant for the last 2 years. It could be, but I'd be open to see if you are not missing some opportunities to improve
  • You didn't introduce any change in your production processes in the last year (product or service), maybe you are ignoring market movement, customer request, improvement opportunities...
  • You can't explain and expose KPI of your business when asked. How long it takes to ... ? How many customers complain about ...? How much it cost to .... last year vs this year?


These are just a few ideas around the concept of "if everything is OK for a long time, then you'd better be concerned and start a BPM initiative right now" ;)

Best !
CEO at Flokzu Cloud BPM Suite
Comment
Good point . . . .". when a company is working fine and don't need to improve its processes" is indeed " ..a worse scenario".

A company in that state probably is losing ground to its competitors.

If a company is not increasing competitive advantage or does not have a focus on increasing competitive advantage, it is in trouble.

I wonder how many CEOs insist on the inclusion in ROIs, of the extent to which each initiative contributes to increasing/maintaining competitive advantage?

Few companies have infinite resources and even for the theoretical scenario where two companies may be perceived to have the "same" resources (infrastructure plus people) the one that makes better use of such resources will pull ahead.
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 6
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Inconveniently (if you're a vendor), it's probably when you ask somebody at the company about BPM and they aren't sure why they would need such a thing. The tilted head and quizzical expression are telltale symptoms of a culture that does not value innovation, market agility, and technological leverage. It's tempting to assume that such companies are headed for failure, but there are always other factors at play. Certainly, they have a vulnerability. And it's fair to say that these are not places at which it would be fun to work.
http://www.bplogix.com/images/icon-x-medium.png
-Scott
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 7
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Fun replies to the question -- i.e. "if you're in business you need BPM"!

More specifically though, the pattern of your work will include repetition. From economics, the set of organizations that need BPM software technology will therefore include most organizations (see the following article on BPM.com: Link Work Of Business And BPM Software Technology).

But why specifically BPM software technology? Or even "why any technology"? Because business is about productivity and productivity is about organization and automation. And BPM technology is THE technology of the work of business (see the following article on BPM.com: Minimum Viable Definition Of BPM Technology).
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  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 8
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An evident need for BPM arises when a company already implemented sufficient amount of individual IT solutions, such as ECM, ERP, CRM, ETL, QAS etc, and is experiencing a growing demand for coordination and alignment among these tools and technologies.

Primary mission of BPM solution is metadata management, process governance and orchestration. Evidently, an organization must accumulate enough metadata and processes to justify orchestrating these. If you have just a handful of simple processes, it might not justify BPM complexities to just streamline one or two.

Demand for BPM is an evident indication of maturity when a company successfully passed through its original growth stage and is going into re-organization and formalization phase mandatory for its further expansion. BPM might serve as a milestone in transition from a startup culture to delimited process landscape of an established enterprise.
Comment
By the time such solutions are in place, the organization has already needed BPM for some time.
@E Scott, Thanks for comment. Indeed, a criteria of right time is very subtle. We might only outline a range, rather than a precise moment. We should also consider that built-in BPM-like facilities of other IT systems could serve as a temporary replacement of full BPM solution for some time, making a transition even more elusive.
  1. John Morris
  2. 1 year ago
  3. #3920
I have often compared the adoption of BPM technology to the adoption of accounting technology. Again a possible comparison: At what point does the startup move from QuickBooks to a more enterprise-class accounting system? The word "phase" was used, implying almost a state change from a small business simplicity to a more differentiated and capable organization - and where the change is abrupt. There are implications for sales and we see this all the time. Adoption of BPM technology is a step function.
@John, marvellous analogy on accounting software. Immediately evident difference for everybody who have ever run a business. Thank you.
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 9
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Perhaps another IT driven "failed" project that fails to engage users in design and build. Had such conversation today great frustration IT live in a different world as they decide a functional operational requirement....!?
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 10
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I agree with Juan J Moreno that the lack of KPIs and process insights is a tell tale sign that is high time for BPM.
It's also important to underline that BPM <> BPMS <> Automation <> Improvement. Taking that BPM is the general foundation for everything "process", then yes, it's recommendable to start a business with BPM in mind from the very beginning. At the latest when losing grip on business causalities.
NSI Soluciones - ABPMP PTY
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 11
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