Kicking off the 2015 BPM.com Thought Leadership Series, this fast-paced and informative webcast focuses on both best practices and common pitfalls (plus how to avoid them) for leveraging case management software in the successful delivery of Shared Services.

Thought Leadership Series

Thursday March 26, 2015 11am EST

Currently one of the leading management initiatives, and for many organizations one of the greatest challenges, is building and delivering a Shared Services center. McKinsey and Company recently cited this as a recommended priority for banks, insurers, government agencies, and many other enterprises – as well as an area too often involving risk and unplanned costs.

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There is clearly a smart way and a wrong way for delivering Shared Services. Which one will you choose? Kicking off the 2015 BPM.com Thought Leadership Series, this fast-paced and informative webcast focuses on both best practices and common pitfalls (plus how to avoid them) for leveraging case management software in the successful delivery of Shared Services.

When leveraged properly, Case Management software enables the delivery of a framework, template, assets, and expertise and reuse that balances the need for both unit autonomy and the efficiency of common capabilities, including dramatically reducing the time otherwise require to build, test, and deploy new applications. deliver more agile and adaptive applications that leverage common services (process, rules and data) and a common UI for a consistent and optimal user experience across multiple apps.

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Strategies, and Best Practices Discussed Include:

  • Enabling a Sustainable Framework to Quickly Meet the Business Challenges
  • How Case Management Enables Business Unit Autonomy
  • Optimizing Re-Use of Resources From Data to Learning Materials
  • If You Build It, But They Don’t Come: Overcoming Enterprise Resistance
  • Standardizing Capabilities and Data Onto a Common Platform
  • Managing Compliance and Governance Across Multiple Business Units
  • How to Best Leverage Native Re-Usability and When Not to

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About the Speakers

Mohammed Attar, IBM Director of ECM Products & Strategy
Mohammed Attar joined IBM in 2006 as part of the FileNet acquisition. Mohammed has over 15 years of experience in the ECM space, and is currently the IBM Director of ECM Products & Strategy. Mohammed has extensive experience both in product development and management. Mohammed started his career as a Software Engineer focused Performance & Systems Analysis. He later spent time serving as a Product Manager over the IBM ECM Platform. In 2008, Mohammed led his first development team, and since then has continued to serve in a leadership capacity in the business. Mohammed was one of the original development managers responsible for the design, development, and delivery of IBM Case Manager. Mohammed holds a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from California State University, Fullerton.

Nathaniel Palmer, VP and CTO, BPM.com
Credited as one of the originators of Adaptive Case Management and rated as the #1 Most Influential Thought Leader in Business Process Management (BPM) by independent research, Nathaniel has the led the design for some of the industry’s largest-scale and most complex projects and Shared-services initiatives, involving investments of $200 Million or more. Previously he had been the BPM Practice Director of SRA International, and prior to that Director, Business Consulting for Perot Systems Corp, as well as spent over a decade with Delphi Group serving as Vice President and Chief Technology Officer. He frequently tops the lists of the most recognized names in his field, and was the first individual named as Laureate in Workflow. Nathaniel has authored or co-authored a dozen books on process innovation and business transformation, including “Intelligent BPM” (2013), “How Knowledge Workers Get Things Done” (2012), “Social BPM” (2011), “Mastering the Unpredictable” (2008) which reached #2 on the Amazon.com Best Seller’s List, “Excellence in Practice (2007), “Encyclopedia of Database Systems” (2007) and “The X-Economy” (2001).

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