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While BPM has been around a long time, some industries have been slow to catch on. So which industry do you think could most take advantage of BPM today?

Thursday, March 05 2015, 09:50 AM
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  • Accepted Answer

    Thursday, March 05 2015, 10:08 AM - #Permalink
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    Very country/region-dependent: healthcare in the US and Switzerland, procurement in some countries, public sector in Greece, everything in Russia, etc.

    Thanks,
    AS

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  • Accepted Answer

    Thursday, March 05 2015, 10:23 AM - #Permalink
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    All of the above!

    What we are seeing in insurance are many antiquated processes running to (no integration) or through (some integration) legacy systems. They have goals to 1) streamline the process, 2) modernize / replace / integrate legacy systems, 3) digitalize the whole thing, and 4) standardize it across product and regions.

    This reality is likely similar in many other industries. Overarching objectives include:

    • Digitalization/Self-Service – End customers want to interact through multiple channels (e.g., direct, online, mobile) to review, buy, and customize products and services
    • Legacy Modernization – Organizations must modernize or replace antiquated systems that do not support web-based/mobile interactions
    • Communications Management – Organizations and their customers (e.g., partners, distributors, end customers) need to communicate directly though all stages of acquisition (i.e., new business, customer service, claims) and retain correspondence throughout to create an efficient and effect experience and ensure compliance
    • Operational Standardization – Despite the increasing number for communication channels, organizations need to standardize to increase efficiencies and enable growth through reusability

    If you think about many processes in all sorts of industries you can break them down into the following stesp:

    1. Intake
    2. Index
    3. Adjuicate
    4. Approve
    5. Settle

    By streamlinig one general process - customer service - you can likely apply lessons learned and reuse solution capabilities to other processes - underwrting, claims.

    Food for thought.

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  • Accepted Answer

    Thursday, March 05 2015, 10:23 AM - #Permalink
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    Unfortunately... Government and Healthcare.

    Too many people suffer because of inneficiencies on these.

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  • Accepted Answer

    Thursday, March 05 2015, 10:29 AM - #Permalink
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    Looking at it from what are the greatest and compelling benefits and "compliance" is the top driver. So regulated industries in financial services such as banking insurance etc. Then the delivery of healthcare mission critical data where errors can cost lives is a very topical sector where BPM thinking with supporting Adaptive software could have big impact. Then there is the public sector generally still to "get it"......huge opportunities out there.

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  • Accepted Answer

    Thursday, March 05 2015, 10:57 AM - #Permalink
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    When you travel or live outside the US as much as I have over the past decade, you realize that the US healthcare system is in desparate need of some good BPM (or, if you just watch the news you might come to the same conclusion). I have spent extended amounts of time in several "developing" countries during the last few years, and everywhere I go the healthcare processes seemed much better, not to mention that the care was cheaper, and delivered by people that actually seem happy providing the care.

    It may seem trivial, but in Colombia, the local cooperative provider even gives a phone call to all its members on their birthdays. It may sound a little silly, but I'll bet that within 12 months they are calling up their members when a user's Apple Watch reports a few spikes in that user's cardio rhythms? Or when an IOT device reports an abnormal drop in skin temperature. Unfortunately, I can't imagine too many healthcare providers in the US doing this anytime soon.

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  • Accepted Answer

    Thursday, March 05 2015, 11:48 AM - #Permalink
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    I think the Vendors are in need of BPM themselves.

    • Garth Knudson
      more than a month ago
      We eat our own dogfood! We use BizFlow for travel and expense, time off, time sheets, sales orders, purchasing, etc. Sometimes I get frustrated with our own processes but we've been trying to apply internally what we provide externally.
    • Kevin Parker
      more than a month ago
      We do too: on boarding, off boarding, time off, services engagements, help desk, ... Serena Business Manager is a tool all of our IT staff can and use and choose to use first.
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  • Accepted Answer

    gB
    gB
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    Thursday, March 05 2015, 12:13 PM - #Permalink
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    It would be view from another angle: For which industry is not relevant BPM? Yes, we feel a lot more comfortable with this question. But we’ll try to answer de original one.

    As always said, it depends.It depends on territory mainly, but also in the size of each company.

    About the territory, we would like to provide the Latam point of view: government should be one the top BPM adopter. Most of Latam countries have eGovernment agencies. So, the framework is set for the next years to apply BPM to every government process.

    About the company size, big companies have adopted BPM in a faster pace than SMBs. So, we think SMBs adopting BPM first, will have a competitive advantage, not only in Latam, but to compete worldwide too.

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  • Accepted Answer

    Thursday, March 05 2015, 12:51 PM - #Permalink
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    I'd have to agree with earlier comments that, at least here in the US, healthcare seems woefully behind in terms of getting process in order. We've seen some fantastic projects in that sector, but they have focused largely on GRC when the real opportunity is in improving care. Everything from prior authorization in the pharmacy, to patient outcomes in the doctor's office, to reducing chaos in the operating theater represent excellent opportunities for BPM.

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  • Accepted Answer

    Thursday, March 05 2015, 02:57 PM - #Permalink
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    Too often IT is like the cobbler's children: always in need of new shoes. It needs automation.

    We think nothing of automating and integrating and disrupting the other lines of business but somehow fear and resist automation ourselves. IDC reports rework through process failures in mid double-digit percentages and my own reseach with our customers puts rework levels consistently around 20% even in the seemingly most optimized of organizations.

    It is like the classic excuse for not automating testing ... "I can test it faster than I can automate it." Sure and I can update the spreadsheet and send the attachment by email faster than I can automate the process. But once automated I soon make up the time and more besides.

    As my first boss was fond of saying, "if you don't have time to do it right when will you have time to do it over?"

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  • Accepted Answer

    Thursday, March 05 2015, 06:35 PM - #Permalink
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    I was surprised this morning to ask the attendees of my webinar on "Straight Talk about the Changing Face of Retail" we asked the question of who is using BPM today. Of the respondents:

    • 30% were using BPM to optimize their retail system today
    • 40% were planning to start next year
    • 30% had no plans.

    That is actually a really low adoption rate for BPM. I don't know if this is the vertical that needs it the MOST, but the retail vertical has a great need for BPM today.

    See the Webinar: http://risnews.edgl.com/web-event/Straight-Talk-about-the-Changing-Face-of-Retail98091

     

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  • Accepted Answer

    Friday, March 06 2015, 11:02 AM - #Permalink
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    In the domain of great BPM questions, this question is one of the best! At least says the sales guy : )

    Specifically, the question is "which industry could take most advantage of BPM today?" And the answers above are great, as expected, with some fascinating and even unexpected insights which reflects the cosmopolitan cadre of BPM enthusiasts hanging around here.

    So, I'll put on my sales hat now. And let's look for "new BPM opportunities".

    Let's say the question is brought up in a boardroom of an organization in "sector 'x'". The CIO and COO together make a pitch to the board for BPM technology and business practices change. What can we learn?

    1. IDEAL USE CASES -- The use cases for new BPM in many industries are terrific. It's worth noting that we should avoid the Lake Wobegon problem (i.e. Garrison Kiellor's snarky reference to a place where "all children are above average") -- i.e. that "BPM is good for you and universally applicable", or "all BPM use cases are above average". So, specifically, where are there really good places to start from?

    2. GOOD USE CASES -- Good use cases are not evenly distributed, and match domain-specific work patterns. On this basis, health care, customer service, insurance, government etc. etc., some mentioned above, might be suitable for BPM. Good use cases should be distinguished from ideal use cases. We might imagine that BPM would be good for healthcare, but then it's hard to even get checklists adopted in a healthcare setting. A good use case answers the question "can BPM be used to help us get the job done here"?

    3. BUSINESS CASE -- The business case for a BPM project is not identical to a good use case. BPM is infrastructure, and funding of any infrastructure in a competitive environment can be challenging. In a regulated or government service environment, business cases might be easier to make. The business case answers the questions "Does the good BPM use case make business and economic sense for us?"

    4. PROGRAMME CAPABILITY -- Even with a good use case and a good business case, there's a question as to whether an organization has the management bandwidth and capability to execute a successful BPM program. The question answered here is "even if we should do a BPM program, can we actually do it?"

    On the basis of these hurdles, the board can assess if their organization, in their industry, is a good candidate for a BPM initiative. Failure to meet these hurdles explains a lot of BPM programme failures.

    And in terms of answering the broader original question, one can systematically assess industry sectors, likely adding size and a few other dimensions, and then highlight "BPM hotspots". Two such areas are supply chain and field service, in both of which there are more-or-less positive answers to the above requirements.

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  • Accepted Answer

    Friday, March 06 2015, 01:15 PM - #Permalink
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    "In the 19th century, you scaled a company by adding people. So management was the key skill and managers earned the big bucks.
    In the 21st century, you scale a company with better data. Datascientists and developers are the core skills." Erik Brynolfsson

    So is BPM part of this future, or is it in the way? After all it started its life as a people management tool.

    Every generation or so (it is getting faster) a base technology comes along which changes the way absolutely everything is done. Trains, telephones, electricity, cars, radio, TV, computer, internet, social, big data...

    BPM is several generations behind.

    So you hit another question. Is it a good idea to move something on a bit, even if it is still behind, or should you leapfrog the whole way in one go?

    Perhaps there is another answer. Evolve the way we do BPM.

    In a data-driven world, process matters more than ever. How well data is handled is the root of competitive advantage.

    BPM can make that consistent. Trackable, governable.
    And where humans do make decisions, it can make sure they have the right information at the right moment.
    It can simplify automation and integration too.

    So where is that most valuable?Well everywhere really.
    There is no single industry it will benefit more, because the whole concept of "industries" and silos is breaking down.

    But we need a new BPM for the 21st century.

     

    • John Morris
      more than a month ago
      Peter, very interesting historical perspective. And from the stats (and personal experience) probably 3/4 of data analysis time is spent on "data munging", or as you put it "how data is handled". The amount of time actually doing deep analysis and advanced statistics is a fraction of the total time associated with big data. And all that "munging" or data wrangling is very much about process -- to your point. Whether this can be a sustainable "root of competitive advantage" is another question. If data management and analysis can be specified and systematized and benefit process at one organization, then another organization can follow.
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  • Accepted Answer

    Saturday, March 07 2015, 11:11 PM - #Permalink
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    The most abundant occurrence in the world is waste. Any industry where waste is an obvious and immediate issue to tackle is in dire need of BPM.
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  • Accepted Answer

    Friday, March 27 2015, 02:37 AM - #Permalink
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    Business environments are becoming more complex and competitive as a result of technological innovations, customer sophistication, and global economic pressures. Companies need to overhaul traditional business models to stay competitive in today’s challenging markets. Based on these factors industries like Healthcare, Telecom and Media, Banking and Financial, Publishing and Insurance are in need of BPM.

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