Resolved
3 votes

What do you think should be the number one BPM priority for a company in the year ahead?

Tuesday, January 12 2016, 09:46 AM
Share this post:
Responses (14)
  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, January 12 2016, 09:55 AM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    6 votes

    BPM is daily business, so the only priority would be 'keep on executing processes that make your customers happy (and like to pay for)'

     

     

    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, January 12 2016, 09:58 AM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    8 votes

    A chance to wheel out my favourite General Patton quote:

    > A good solution applied with vigor now is better than a perfect solution applied ten minutes later.

    Applied to BPM I'd recommend that this continues our pursuit of upskilling and empowering business users within an appropriate framework of governance and auditability.

    And one more thing: solutions created out of observed data rather than hunch or 'established wisdom' will continue to be disruptive so that empowerment had better have an analytic component.

    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, January 12 2016, 09:59 AM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    7 votes

    I would suggest mapping constituent intteractions. I would start with customer Journeys and go from there. This is easier said than done because organizations think their processes are already there. I would guess the results of the mapping would open a few eyes.

    • Emiel Kelly
      more than a month ago
      I think processes are already there, because products or services are delivered, but indeed these might not be the right processes (anymore). And of course all processes can be improved.

      Agree with you 'making sure we do the right thing (processes) here, should be the priority. Gadgets will come later.
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, January 12 2016, 10:12 AM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    7 votes

    Focus on the business outcomes and TCO, quit getting distracted by:

    - hourly rate

    - the ups and downs of daily business news

    - requirements that aren't tied to buisiness outcomes

    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, January 12 2016, 10:13 AM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    4 votes

    Before you start understand "how" the BPM supporting software will deliver exactly what is required and the inevitable future change. This will include the adaptive user forms and of course how to handle the mess of legacy! Might be a good idea to understand cost?

    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, January 12 2016, 10:17 AM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    6 votes

    I would say the number one priority for companies would be in instilling a process mindset in regular business users. This process mindset is prevalant in I.T. but its prevalance with regular business users is very uneven. Only once regular business users start driving this will organizations start realizing the full potential of BPM.

    Part of this involves investing in educational initiatives and the other part involves investing in tools geared towards business users.

    I also think the BPM industry needs to do its part in evangelizing the benefits of BPM when driven by business users. (Or at least the part of the BPM industry that believes this :). Obviously vendors that believe this will do some of this evangelizing, but BPM consultants and Lean consultants also have an invaluable role to play here.

     
    • Emiel Kelly
      more than a month ago
      To be honest, I think regular business users have more of a process mindset than IT.
    • Ranjit Notani
      more than a month ago
      @Emiel, I think *some* regular business users have an intuitive grasp of their 'processes'. Amongst those that have this mindset, they have a huge advantage over I.T. in that they understand their needs at a much deeper level. For others not so much. This is why I used the term 'uneven'.

      Even for those that have a process mindset the issue may be that there is no easy way for them to easily actualize their processes. The ways that one sees today are
      1) Tribal knowledge.
      2) Written document
      3) Apps
      4) Engage with I.T. to build a process for them

      #3 works well when the App does what the business user wants. This is the optimal scenario. When the app does not meet needs there needs to be something better than #1 or #2.
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Tim Bryce
    Tim Bryce
    Offline
    Tuesday, January 12 2016, 10:47 AM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    4 votes

    Take stock of your systems, evaluate the business processes within them, such as age and deficiencies, and prioritize them for review by management. Also prepare a preliminary cost/benefit analysis on the top 10 or 20 processes. Determine which need modification and which truly need to be rewritten from scratch.

    References:

    1. http://timbryce.com/
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, January 12 2016, 11:12 AM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    7 votes

    Stop treating BPM as a (periodic) vehicle for automation or proofing compliancy (only). Start seeing BPManagement as the fundamental (knowledge) base where your business (at all times) depends on. Not because of workflow or case. But simply because you KNOW how stuff (dare I say strategy) can get executed in a better and more controlled way.

    Anything in life is a process. Without process nothing happens. Control the process better, and you'll change behaviour and outcome. Obviously information, resources (people) and tools (technology) is tightly related here...

    I might be acting again the philosopher role here, but hey...

    • Emiel Kelly
      more than a month ago
      You should add some Latin phrases.
    • John Morris
      more than a month ago
      Processus ergo sumus.
      Processo ergo sum.
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, January 12 2016, 11:15 AM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    4 votes

    The number one priority is to get rid of the phrase BPM as it currently stands and replace witth Management of Processes for the Business User. Put BPMN in the end user deployment bin and use a notation that can easily define the BPA (Business Process Architecture!).

    • Tim Bryce
      more than a month ago
      You mean what we used to call, "Systems"?
    • Emiel Kelly
      more than a month ago
      Business users don't manage processes. They manage cases. And might execute a process for each case.
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Ian Gotts
    Ian Gotts
    Offline
    Tuesday, January 12 2016, 12:07 PM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    6 votes

    Start looking at your business from the customer's perspective - what is the CX (customer experience). Think of that as a process and make it leaner and then more consistent across all your teams, offices, locations, channels. Then automate whatver you can to improve responsiveness and compliance

    • E Scott Menter
      more than a month ago
      +1 for "customer experience". Huge importance to organizations, much less emphasis by BPM vendors.
    • Emiel Kelly
      more than a month ago
      Agree. But I never knew there was another view on processes than from the customer's perspective.
    • John Morris
      more than a month ago
      +1 again CX, similar to what Mr. Sinur calls "customer journey", or what could also be called "narrative". It's not just the "customer" experience, it's the end-to-end experience, journey or narrative of any actor. Thinking in these terms raises us out of the swamp of technical acronyms into a world of direct engagement with day-to-day work. [OK, I don't know many business people that talk frequently about "journey" or "narrative", but the intent is useful . . . ]
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, January 12 2016, 12:11 PM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    6 votes

    A real example from one of my clients - "Implementing process-centric solutions by us not by the professional services of our BPM-suite tool vendor".

    Thanks,

    AS

    Like
    1
    • E Scott Menter
      more than a month ago
      Very good! It's OK if a customer decides, upon consideration, that it makes the most sense for their business to have the vendor do the development. There are plenty of good reasons that might be the case.

      But as vendors, it's our job to ensure that customers can, if they so desire, cut the cord and proceed to grow their internal capabilities. We're a lot more interested in successful customers than we are in a few services dollars here and there.
    • Emiel Kelly
      more than a month ago
      Agree! Would you ask your kitchen supplier to learn you how to cook a fabulous boeuf bourguignon?
    • Dr Alexander Samarin
      more than a month ago
      Emiel, The professional services of our BPM-suite tool vendor "cooked" successfully a few projects for us. But, our strategy is "configure it ourselves" to keep the knowledge in house and to carry out small improvements internally.

      Also, we want to build a corporate unified business execution (CUBE) platform ( see http://improving-bpm-systems.blogspot.ch/2015/10/enterprise-patterns-peas-example-cube.html ) in which the BPM-suite tool is only one of the components.
    • Emiel Kelly
      more than a month ago
      @Alexander Maybe I should have said then: Would you ask your kitchen supplier to learn you how to run your restaurant?
    • Dr Alexander Samarin
      more than a month ago
      @Emiel Actually, we use this BPM-suite tool as PaaS which is a component in our CUBE platform (see "Typology of platforms" - http://improving-bpm-systems.blogspot.ch/2015/12/typology-of-platforms.html ). Thus they (as well as our IaaS provider and several SaaS providers) run a well-defined part of our "cuisine".
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, January 12 2016, 01:02 PM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    4 votes

    I'm going to cheat by not limiting myself to only one "#1". Sue me.☻

    • Customers! Customers! Customers! BPM isn't just for the back office anymore. Oh, and by the way, your eforms (with all due respect) are probably horrible. Before you show them to customers, get some UI/UX/CX folks in to redesign them for you.
    • Supply chain partners. Your vendors and and partners are intrinsic to your processes and your success. Turn them into full-fledged participants in your BPM-driven applications.
    • Render unto workflow what is workflow's, and to case what is case's. In other words: traditional process and case management aren't all that distinct. Your BPM-driven applications should be able to easily take advantage of both paradigms, flowing easily out of one, into the other, and back into the first again.
    • Recognize BPM for what it is: a platform for the rapid design, creation, deployment, operation, and iterative improvement of robust, custom business applications. Build teams with the appropriate skills for making the most of this technology. These teams may include analysts, architects, builders, UI/UX/CX, and others who grok the BPM paradigm and know how to exploit it without treating it like something it's not, something with which they may be more familiar (a common problem with programmers, for example).

    I take it back. The last one is #1.

    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, January 12 2016, 03:00 PM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    3 votes

    BPM is proven both as a methodolgoy and solution platform. So find a project. Get started by identifying and classifying improvement opportunities based on likely financial, customer, and strategic benefits. Create and score projects based on benefits (e.g., strategic fit, cost savings) vs effort (e.g., resources, duration, capital investment, risk), and select the candidate with highest value and/or just-do-it potential. Assign project sponsors and teams, gather remaining inputs and outputs, create scope and project charters, and define project plans. Then go do it. Apply lessons learned to the next project. Go from smaller projects to larger projects as team become comfortable and management committed.

    • John Morris
      more than a month ago
      Garth, good sales model . . . except isn't this the same recipe that has been used by savvy BPM sales people for 10 years? Or any technology for that matter? Are we at a tipping point or something? And now all this hard work is going to start to pay off faster? : )
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Wednesday, January 13 2016, 12:55 PM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    3 votes

    Get rid of the Project Methodology.

    Done as a project, BPM is costly, disruptive and rarely produces the benefits envisaged. Worst of all, once the project team leaves, that is as good as it gets - as the process need evolves, the process doesn't leaving it trapped in a timewarp.

    Take a leaf from the machine learning and lean startup handbooks. Simply create the existing process in your BPM software, then set up a learning and AB testing system which analyses the data the system produces and makes predictions on what works better, then testing those and creating a winner stays on iterative process. Instead of a process which decays, you now have a process which learns and continually optimises and adapts to changes. This system basically gets better every time you use it, eliminating the need for costly project teams to come back in and refresh every few years.

    Projects were part of the old, static world, not the new fast-moving one. And if your company still thinks in projects, it is on the way out.

    The reply is currently minimized Show
Your Reply

Join the Discussion

Want to join the discussion?

Login, or create an account to participate in the forum.

Top Participants

Dr Alexander Samarin
278 Replies
30/09/2016
David Chassels
271 Replies
30/09/2016
Emiel Kelly
223 Replies
30/09/2016
Bogdan Nafornita
210 Replies
30/09/2016
E Scott Menter
182 Replies
28/09/2016