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In this discussion, Does Mobile Require a Company to Redesign Its Business Processes? Steve Weissman states:
If the current processes are well conceived, they shouldn't require a redesign to go mobile, merely the addition of the new mobile capabilities.
So what is the key to well conceived processes?
Tuesday, January 14 2014, 09:30 AM
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  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, January 14 2014, 09:40 AM - #Permalink
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    Flexibility. From compliance to innovation, processes change and companies that build processes without the flexibility to change suffer erosion of their operations pretty quickly.
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    Tuesday, January 14 2014, 09:50 AM - #Permalink
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    Processes are just a means. The means to deliver services or products that someone or somebody wants. So the need for long lasting processes is also the long lasting need for services or products. For some that is, but in our competing world these needs might change and change. Probably this will not automatically lead to a dramatic change of the way those products or services are created or delivered. But when that is the case you indeed, like Chris said, need flexibility to understand the changes needed in all the aspects (workflow, people, information, system, steering etc) of a performing process. This needs a process aware organization and people who feel comfortable and capable to make the necessary changes. So I think it isn't about long lasting processes. I think it is about long lasting performance by the right level of adapting processes. And that might be different from process to processes. Back office processes might work well for years, while primary processes need change more often.
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    Tuesday, January 14 2014, 09:55 AM - #Permalink
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    I would say that the form of your data is more permanent than the form of your processes. We've not changed the essential layout of an invoice in centuries and the data model of customer, order, item is basically identical in every organization. How we process those orders for those customers and create those invoices is a never ending evolution, from serried ranks of clerks to emails on your phone, of processes (nowadays) enshrined in technology. Get the data model right and choose a process automation tool that allows for easy modification of process and you will be well placed to adapt to the needs of the business. Get the data model wrong and every change of process will strain the patience of the users and the abilities of the tool.
    • Emiel Kelly
      more than a month ago
      In the end many 'modern' products are just a collection of information, so good point! (if the need for the information stays the same ;-)
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    Tuesday, January 14 2014, 09:55 AM - #Permalink
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    Oh, sure, blame me! :) Chris, Emiel, and Kevin are correct in what they say, but for me, the answer lies in designing processes with a hyper-focus on the specific business operations involved regardless of who participates in them. Too often, organizations set up their work flows to accommodate the strengths and weaknesses of the people doing the work, which may be OK in the early stages of a company but can really be a drag on things after the organization grows -- and culturally can be really hard to change!
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    Tuesday, January 14 2014, 09:58 AM - #Permalink
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    "The only constant is change" - ergo you don't want to embed a process that's going to be long lasting otherwise you defeat the purpose of trying to continually improve.
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  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, January 14 2014, 10:14 AM - #Permalink
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    The only long-lasting processes are the ones that are easy to change.
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    Tuesday, January 14 2014, 10:26 AM - #Permalink
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    Engagement of users in build of "their" processes and their understanding that change is no longer an "IT" barrier. This will ensure a long life and good investment in the required BPM supporting platform software. So understanding "how" becomes important...?
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    Tuesday, January 14 2014, 11:10 AM - #Permalink
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    Theo and Bogdan get cheers from me! I infer that "long lasting" means more than five years. If that is the case and given today's fast changing volatile marketplace, I wouldn't suggest that any business focus on "long lasting' business processes. Build a business with a nimble model and count on changing (tweaking, if you will) those business processes constantly!
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    Tuesday, January 14 2014, 12:54 PM - #Permalink
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    If the current processes are well conceived, they shouldn't require a redesign to go mobile, merely the addition of the new mobile capabilities.
    I respectfully disagree. Any new technology, especially one as disruptive as mobile (and even more especially in the context of the mobile/cloud/BYOD convergence), should cause you to re-examine your business processes to see what new opportunities exist. Mobile banking is a great example. You could argue (though, as a former banking guy, I'd disagree) that activities like checking your balance or transferring funds on your phone is simply, as Steve, suggests, "merely the addition of new mobile capabilities". But then somebody thought about it some more and realized that mobile introduced a whole new opportunity to increase customer satisfaction while reducing overhead costs: scanning checks for deposit. There are a ton of other examples. Certainly, some of your most basic processes will change minimally, even over long periods. But, you always have to keep an eye out for the chance to do something really disruptive as your technological capabilities increase over time.
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  • Accepted Answer

    Wednesday, January 15 2014, 01:00 AM - #Permalink
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    Easy ... just use typical BPM. Processes are so hard to define and change that once they are done, they usually last long!
    • Emiel Kelly
      more than a month ago
      Bit will they also be used long? ;-)
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  • Accepted Answer

    Wednesday, January 15 2014, 09:20 AM - #Permalink
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    Max Can't let that go unchallenged! Maybe you are right about the early BPM supporting technologies but not now. Defining is asking the people step by step what they do and then what they think they should do - both the formal and the informal. Today the definition can be very quickly displayed exactly as expressed into a digitised solution. As other have said change is now supported with iterative build and future change (some better than others). The "same process" will in 10 years look quite different yet will have evolved from original as the business and users require.
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