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If you had to boil it down to one thing, in your experience what most often makes the difference between success and failure with business process management?
Tuesday, January 21 2014, 09:29 AM
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    Tuesday, January 21 2014, 09:33 AM - #Permalink
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    People. Whether it's an Exec or the customer service agent completing a new customer application form on a screen, it's their attitude and desire to effect change in the organization that is the single and most fundamental factor in BPM success. Everything else follows after.
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    Tuesday, January 21 2014, 09:53 AM - #Permalink
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    To add to Theo's point of view. If a business leader is strongly involved in knowing the business and driving change, then they typically have a clear picture of where they need/want to go with the business. When the organization is at this point they are ready or have already modeled their business processes. This reduces time and effort to move the organization from models to implementation of BPM tools. If change is being driven by the front line employees, it typically takes a lot more evangelizing to get other team members and management to support and buy off on changes that move organizations to BPM.
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    Tuesday, January 21 2014, 09:57 AM - #Permalink
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    Having spent a fair bit of time in "BPM world" but having left for another area of IT - I'd have to say that fast time to results seems to be something we'd missed. I think Theo and Jason's points are right but I think showing the fast results means that everyone gets behind it. People are key - allowing the people to show the benefit of BPM very quickly is a key factor in success of failure.
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    Tuesday, January 21 2014, 10:22 AM - #Permalink
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    The glib answer would be "patience". But I agree with all above: commitment and leadership from executives at all levels.
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    Tuesday, January 21 2014, 10:36 AM - #Permalink
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    I'd add end users' adoption. Employees don't care what's underneath. Whether it's BPMS, ERP, ACM or whatever. They just want to get the job done and usually expect following things from a solution of this kind: 1. To actually work. 2. To be user friendly (especially in terms of interface). 3. To speed up and ease up their daily duties.
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    Tuesday, January 21 2014, 10:51 AM - #Permalink
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    When users really care with recognition their views are important?
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    Tuesday, January 21 2014, 11:07 AM - #Permalink
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    Architecture is the way to get the support from the stakeholders. It is necessary to explain to each group of stakeholders how their concerns will be addressed and how their current working practices will be changed for the better. (This is a typical duty of the chief architect of the BPM system.) Coherent and clear explanations in the business language are vital for the success of a BPM project. Success is not about saying “Yes” to all requests from the “more important” staff members; it is about building a common understanding and agreement between all stakeholders. Thanks, AS
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    Tuesday, January 21 2014, 11:58 AM - #Permalink
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    End user adoption !
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    Tuesday, January 21 2014, 12:18 PM - #Permalink
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    All of the preceding answers point to a re-hash of mine - "subject matter expertise." Without it, the business sponsor isn't engaged and fully supporting the project or initiative. Without it, the infrastructure team doesn't know just how exactly - WAN, database, middleware - to scale the environment. Without it the team doesn't know how hard, how long it will take to build the app. Without it users don't know what the purpose of the exercise is - better, cheaper, faster, easier.
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    Tuesday, January 21 2014, 12:42 PM - #Permalink
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    Agreeing with the majority of opinions, here's one more testimony of my own experience: 1) Commitment of top management; 2) Promote the meeting of interests between top management and stakeholders at different levels (from middle management until performers). The clarification of the strategy and alignment with process architecture (since the macro processes until tasks) help to identify the benefits and to clarify the message for each stakeholder. 3) An effective project management by small stages with evidence of benefits for the entire organization. It is easier to control, allows for better management of expectations and promotes the motivation. On the other hand, makes it easier a progressive internalization of BPM, as a new management discipline.
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    Tuesday, January 21 2014, 12:47 PM - #Permalink
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    Indeed, in the end great performance comes from people with a shared goal. But be aware that an organization has processes, but people get paid to do their job. So, are goals really shared? Translated to BPM, that means common understanding of the processes of the organization, and the desired results and goals of those processes. If you’re not aware of the promises of your organization’s processes, what will you be contributing to all day then? People should be aware that BPM is just daily business (and not a system) and the ‘M’ is the most important; having the right level of grip to make those processes do what they promise. So showing the people how well the ‘m’ works is the best way to start in my opinion. Just showing people what a process has to deliver and how it’s performing. It’s just good old monitoring and I don’t care if that is done with fancy BI tooling or just post-its on a plan board. But it should make the people aware what’s going on in the process. Live. And this information should not stay in the management room. It should be available to all process players. In that way they see the cases in the process and if they’re on track. So, to answer the question; engaging people in process by showing them the performance of the processes they contribute to. And that’s not done with social process mapping tools in the cloud, but with immediate feedback on the execution of the process. It’s like the ‘satnav’ in a plane. Everybody is informed live about the progress of the process. Then still of course: ‘What’s a speedometer without a throttle or a brake? Useless! ’ So, empowerment and self steering is another prerequisite that comes with it. If you don’t want that; just force everyone into a workflow tool and pay them for their job.
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  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, January 21 2014, 02:14 PM - #Permalink
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    All very good points. I'd add that the selection of the first couple of processes to be implemented is vitally important. Start with a win, build support, pile on another win, and the odds of long-term success grow rapidly. Start by trying to boil the ocean (or even a large-ish lake) and you're setting yourself up like a bowling pin, just waiting to be knocked aside by somebody who knows how to build on success.. (I guess it's my day for mixing metaphors.)
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  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, January 21 2014, 03:55 PM - #Permalink
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    People! You need the right people to: - Ask questions (goals, metrics, rules, layouts, scope) - Collect and document requirements - Get agreements - Install and configure products - Implement solutions (flows, forms, interfaces, integration, reports, dashboards) - Provide training - Create standards for selecting projects, documenting requirements, training, layouts, etc) - Manage projects and scope creep - Ensure team unity and resourcing - Ensure communications People matter.
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