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When measuring success with BPM, what would you say is the key metric?
Thursday, September 11 2014, 09:43 AM
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    Thursday, September 11 2014, 09:57 AM - #Permalink
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    I guess it starts by understanding what to do you mean by BPM success. Every organization has different goals to start BPM iniatives, and evey BPM initiative has its own particular characteristics. But as a personal point of view, I would list these as the most important things to "metrify" to define a successful implementation of BPM (long-term thinking): => More customer satisfaction => More new customers => Higher employee engagement and less turnover => Quicker time to market for products and services => Production cost reduction
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    Thursday, September 11 2014, 10:02 AM - #Permalink
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    The width of the smile on the face of our happy customers. At least that's what we tell on our website, but of course it is shareholder value.
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    Thursday, September 11 2014, 10:07 AM - #Permalink
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    The ultimate metric is ROI, but the question is how to calculate R - there's hard return and soft return - I've worked with customer who focused on NPS, or on other customer satisfaction scores, as well as with customers who focused on time-to-respond to customer requests, or $ saved, or revenue through the process. So many different ways to compute that return that feeds into ROI. Of course, in some cases, the Return is "stay in business" - e.g. regulation compliance, catch up with competition, etc. :)
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    Thursday, September 11 2014, 10:08 AM - #Permalink
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    It varies from company to company. I always have my customer come up with an objective metric that will define success for them. However, even though it is subjective I do like the 'smile of our customers' response.
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    Thursday, September 11 2014, 10:15 AM - #Permalink
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    Employee adoption!!!
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    Thursday, September 11 2014, 10:26 AM - #Permalink
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    I'd be hard pressed to say that there is only one key metric. While the focus may differ from organization to organization, I believe there are three key metrics -- customer satisfaction, regulatory compliance, and operational efficiency.
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    Thursday, September 11 2014, 10:26 AM - #Permalink
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    Employee and customer satisfaction. All the others follow from that. Sure many companies measure many different and quite useless numbers. Useless because these numbers do not tell you what to improve. The employee and customer know what to improve and ideally you allow them to make that improvement themselves, within compliancy and financial bounds of course. It is a management and BPM fallacy that some central bureaucracy can 'measure to manage'. That's what the communists thought too ...
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    Thursday, September 11 2014, 10:30 AM - #Permalink
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    Markets move faster than company decision making ever can. Trying to keep up using step-change is a doomed undertaking – it results in a sawtooth which catches up, then falls behind again – all accompanied with so much disruption that good people leave. BPM has the power to change that. To create a system which learns from the data and the customer feedback. Which continually improves, then improves on that improvement. And adapts as needs change. Ideally it moves the company from behind to in-front – to a position where it is the market leader in that process. The three axes are normally faster, better, cheaper and the end game is more efficient, more effective and more user friendly than any other on all three axes. So I would take two metrics (never take only one – one can mislead you down a wrong path) First is pace of change. How much better the process is doing than it did yesterday and the day before. Sure you’ll see an S curve, but extending the vertical on that is what will really drive improvement. Second is by how far you outperform all those around you. Assuming it is a key metric, than that is measured by customers. If being faster means customers are attracted, then that should show. If being cheaper while retaining profit margins is what matters in your field, then that will show in customer numbers too. And if slow systems are creating churn, that will show negatively. Oh and if it doesn’t show on what really matters to the company - customers - then why are you wasting time improving it? Don’t get sucked in by internal stuff – it may be easier to measure but it isn’t building competitive advantage. Customers and pace of change are the true metrics.
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    Thursday, September 11 2014, 11:02 AM - #Permalink
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    I'm in agreement with most of these comments. Overall, I think that customer satisfaction and ROI are the best measures. But as a company takes it step by step, I would say starting with individual projects you want to see improvement and adoption with each project based on the improvement targets. And then as the organization moves to a more enterprise wide BPM approach, I think they want to measure sustainment and learning as well. Are managers and employees really beginning to make continuous improvement part of their mind set and daily work?
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    Ian Gotts
    Ian Gotts
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    Thursday, September 11 2014, 11:11 AM - #Permalink
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    Sustained adoption. Come back 1 month, 3 months, 6 months later and are the new working practices and systems still being used or have staff reverted to the old ways.
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    Tim Bryce
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    Thursday, September 11 2014, 11:25 AM - #Permalink
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    A homogeneous working environment where everyone speaks on a common level, and performs development in a uniform manner.
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    Thursday, September 11 2014, 12:32 PM - #Permalink
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    Employee adoption can be misleading. After all, in many cases, the poor folks who work for you don't have a choice. For example, in most places I've worked, we enjoyed 100% employee adoption of the employee handbook—because you didn't get to work there unless you signed it. For internal workflow app deployments, then, I would say success is measured by demand for new BPM-driven solutions. For customer-facing deployments, adoption is a pretty good proxy for success. If your workflow app is widely adopted and you're still not making money, I'm not sure it's the BPM platform that's to blame.
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    Thursday, September 11 2014, 05:36 PM - #Permalink
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    Before defining key metrics of success, we would have to establish the type of deliveries. So what would your BPM effort deliver? Process documentation? Business automation? Business Process Improvement?...
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    Friday, September 12 2014, 12:58 AM - #Permalink
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    My metric of BPM success – a ratio actual-enterprise-agility / desired-enterprise-agility Where “enterprise agility” is pace of implementing changes requested by business, customers, management, IT, compliance, etc. Ideally, this ration should be > 1. Thanks, AS
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    Friday, September 12 2014, 04:28 AM - #Permalink
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    Once your people realise their views matter and "IT" is not a barrier to change. A real quote sums it up. “It captures all my weird and wonderful ideas and all done without telling me that I am expecting too much!” Now that is what all users should be saying? This brings the new challenge to "manage" user enthusiasm to change the supporting software.....?
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    Friday, September 12 2014, 07:13 AM - #Permalink
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    I am going to go with Emiel on this one: it is always shareholder value, unless we ignore the "B" in BPM. I could only expand by saying that it is actually "sustainable shareholder value", because sustainable means you would want to create shareholder value through all proper intermediate driver metrics, like customer satisfaction, employee happiness, efficiency, agility etc. Sorry to be the boring guy around on this one, but there is a joke about it: Q: Why did the CFO cross the road? A: To bore the people on the other side too!
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    Friday, September 12 2014, 03:25 PM - #Permalink
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    interesting discussion and view points. As everyone has stated - the key metrics for the BPM success factor depends on the stakeholders and their respective banchmarked values : For Business it may be --> RoI on a long run (but instantly the happy reaction of its customers) For End User it may be --> Better User Experience, Faster Response & Low Latency is a plus!! For Developer it may be --> Uff...the code is finally pushed to production and there is no Issue/Downtime reported!! :) But in all the cases "Measurement / Monitoring" plays a pivotal role: Measurement in terms of : - increase in customer base - increase in customer cases - performance statistics - customer feedback/response - user experience - ...many more The Success of BPM cannot be an open ended thread. As BPM deals with Process Optimizations and Process improvement based on feedback - the measured feedback will be a crucial indicator to trigger/optimize the process again. (which in turn makes all stakeholders happy!!)
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    Tuesday, October 13 2015, 07:35 AM - #Permalink
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    Select measures that track the outcomes of the process from a product standpoint and customer standpoint. These should be results that provide value to the customer.

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