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Late last year, Gartner predicted major vendor upheaval because of big shifts in IT. Do you think this will include the BPM market in 2014?
Thursday, January 02 2014, 09:27 AM
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    Thursday, January 02 2014, 09:46 AM - #Permalink
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    In 2014, we'll see alternative, non-BPMN, process models become increasingly mainstream. Conventional BPMS has been extended, often by acquisition, but the underlying model itself is sub-optimal for distributed, concurrent, and adaptive processes. Processes tend to be entrenched by nature so I would suspect that current BPMS technologies will remain for quite awhile, though the use will be increasingly oriented to legacy processes, as the predominance of new processes shift to lighter-weight, more flexible and scalable models.
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    Thursday, January 02 2014, 09:48 AM - #Permalink
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    and Happy New Year's to you Peter!
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    Thursday, January 02 2014, 11:19 AM - #Permalink
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    The vast majority of tools in use in the business today are point solutions designed for a specific purpose. Some of these have primitive workflow built into them like some of the CRM systems. Of course there are the ubiquitous generic solutions, like Excel/Numbers and Word/Pages for general problems and these have little process in them. Increasingly we see Microsoft, SAP, SFDC, and their ilk (but not Apple thus far), introduce technology to support the ordered flow of activities not just in support of the task the tool is designed for but into a broader, enterprise context. Integration with other business systems, collaboration with public and private social media and automation of manual tasks are at the top of the check-list of savvy BPMS buyers today and this is driving the expansion of process capabilities in existing tool-sets. 2014 will see BPMS vendors increasingly select specialized markets to exploit with their unique strengths. Others, who try to remain generic solutions to generic problems, will be absorbed into larger vendors who need to take their problem-specific technology to the next level. Acquiring vendors need to be aware that BPMS is the horse and not the cart and let the newly acquired process technology lead the existing and established functionality. This is going to be hard as the acquirer always assumes they are the leading technology and the acquired is an add-on. We all need to remember the adage I learned when I started in this business ... "Process first; tool second" ... and we'll be just fine. Let that be our New Year's BPMS Resolution.
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    Thursday, January 02 2014, 04:47 PM - #Permalink
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    Forgive my contrarian tendencies, but I don't believe the logic chain holds up here. In the piece, Gartner says "increased in IT spending isn't necessarily good news for established IT vendors" and "approximately two-thirds of the respondents said they expect to change primary suppliers by 2017." What this says to me is that vendors will have to work harder to maintain their customer bases -- which is a very good thing for customers, by the way, But I don't see where this necessarily leads to "vendor upheaval" unless vendors overall are unable to transition to a focus on service from a fixation on sales. Or is that the embedded point being made?
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    Friday, January 03 2014, 06:23 AM - #Permalink
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    Enterprise software is long over due for that "big shift" from complexity to simplicity to reflect the real world of work where business logic never changes! However the now handful of "big" vendors have a vested interest running into $bns which will fight the required changes. But they will eventually lose; indeed signs it is already happening exampled by recent hard hitting article from the Economist http://www.economist.com/news/21588893-tech-elite-will-join-bankers-and-oilmen-public-demonology-predicts-adrian-wooldridge-coming The headlines "The coming tech-lash" and "The tech elite will join bankers and oilmen in public demonology". I believe it will be the "BPM" movement that will drive next generation applications big and small. Coders will only have a support role as all business requirements simple and complex will be driven and largely by business professionals such as analysts working direct with users. Change will be readily supported at low cost and I agree with Dave the old "BPMN" will fall into history as new technologies will reflect the user needs at both front and back office. Orchestration of required data from any source to any device will see digitisation and "BPM" supporting technologies be seamlessly linked. Already many seeing the need for "platform thinking" see http://www.beingguided.com/about-platform-thinking/#! where all business logic pre-coded This will require a single platform and dare I suggest trying to "cobble" together old acquired technologies will fail to match the agility and adaptability of the new BPM software technologies designed from the outset to address the real business issues? Cloud computing delivering SaaS in my language is a payment method so the old model of having to “pay” up front will become linked to the alternative that all industries offer a “lease buy” but recognising the data created always belongs and can be transferred to the owner to avoid “lock in”. Over time the complexities associated with legacy will reduce to the point having in-house infrastructure becomes commercially sensible but that will be beyond 2014! 2014 will be an interesting year and much pain for vendors with old technologies but the real winner will at last be the customer; a sure sign that Enterprise Software Technology is on that first step to maturing to being a “commodity” which places emphasis on “business knowledge” not “technology”?
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    Monday, January 06 2014, 02:10 PM - #Permalink
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    I think that BPM - process improvement - needs to help Business and IT work together - in both the complex world and for simpler situations. So enabling Business and IT to do work together easily and make changes easily. We are already seeing some of that, but mobile will drive it farther I hope.
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