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Essentially the opposite of the BPM Forum question last week, What Is the Key to Business Agility in an Organization? where there seemed to be some argument to what lead to agility, and what lead to the inability to change. So how do you make sure BPM or BPMS does not lead to stagnation or ossification?
Tuesday, March 11 2014, 09:43 AM
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  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, March 11 2014, 09:50 AM - #Permalink
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    "Continuous process improvement." The roundtrip from execution to analytics, always making sure it's being done as efficiently as possible, continually refining the process definition(s) given the metrics coming off the system telling what's actually happening versus what was intended or designed.
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    Tuesday, March 11 2014, 09:52 AM - #Permalink
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    By treating it as daily business instead of seeing BPM as a project (in a separate building, by a team of specialists, in theory) with too high expectations
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    Tuesday, March 11 2014, 10:13 AM - #Permalink
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    Not much to add to the previous comments. Focus on the how products / services are delivered and this is enough to have the process improvement engine humming.
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  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, March 11 2014, 10:28 AM - #Permalink
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    It is mandatory to anticipate in the architecture of your BPM system (a portfolio of business processes of the enterprise, as well as the practices and tools for governing the design, execution and evolution of this portfolio as a system) the following: - How to implement quick changes (business and technical) to achieve the continual process improvement (thanks to Patrick). - How to keep the human in charge for the highly automated business because the such knowledge maybe lost. - How to protect the BPM system from the disturbances of the IT infrastructure. - How to assemble more complex processes from existing smaller processes. - How to build an enterprise as a system of processes (ideally). Thanks, AS
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    Tuesday, March 11 2014, 11:20 AM - #Permalink
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    Users need to have confidence in the "BPM" supporting software that is it does just that in their language! Once they realise change is easy even encouraged then stagnation is no longer an option? So critical that research undertaken on the best software to achieve this simple but game change attitude to Enterprise Software. AS’s suggestions a sound starting point so go for it…..!
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  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, March 11 2014, 12:01 PM - #Permalink
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    Time and inertia and "the way things have been done" leads to stagnation. That has nothing to do with BPM or BPMS. The stagnation is happening. The question is, what are the best tools with which to do something about it. BPM is one framework/set of tools for addressing stagnation and complacency (continuous process improvement being a typical modifier). Having said that, if the attitude of the company or organization is to "do BPM" once, and then move on, they'll see stagnation in BPM solutions as well. Solutions and systems (and people!) require some TLC along the way to keep them fresh and relevant.
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  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, March 11 2014, 12:44 PM - #Permalink
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    Traditional BPM seeks to take something that is inherently dynamic -- how the business does things -- and make it inherently static, by formalizing processes. At that point the only recourse is the continuous process improvement that Patrick refers to, working through cycles that seek to add agility to static processes. In other words, we'll take our rice and bleach it, and then sprinkle on some vitamins to replace some of the nutrition. Not very healthy in the end! A better approach is to leverage a BPM capability that is inherently dynamic -- one that doesn't remove the inherent variability of processes as the organization seeks to formalize them. Traditional BPM tools aren't up to this challenge. I'm suggesting a new way of thinking about how technology supports inherently dynamic processes.
    • Patrick Lujan
      more than a month ago
      Max, Keith, is that you? :D
    • Scott Francis
      more than a month ago
      i'm not sold that BPM makes something dynamic into something static. That seems like a red herring.
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  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, March 11 2014, 01:34 PM - #Permalink
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    I was going to say something insightful and illuminating... but Scott beat me to it. The question is actually a non-sequitur. To the extent stagnation occurs, it's not because of a failure in the BPM solution but rather because the business has failed to recognize and reify process changes that reflect the evolution of their business model, customer demands, and regulatory requirements.
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  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, March 18 2014, 01:07 PM - #Permalink
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    I cannot disagree with what was said previously, but I can add to it with a business-first view that actually isn't ideal. I see this in some customers who have brought in BPM from the business side, had a successful first or second project with positive outcomes, but then somehow lose momentum. I have spent a lot of time working with these customers and have two general keys to beating inertia. The first is to market your success -- get folks to understand that doing things differently on both the business and IT side have big benefits. There are lots of ways to do this, but the two best are to get your executive sponsors to share openly with their peers. The second is to be able to show how it was better and help others see what they could do. And, don't say "BPM." The second key is for the business to really team with IT effectively. IT can feel put out by BPM success. Remember that the first project was still a pilot of a new approach to them. If you shove it in their face, you will find them staunch defenders of the old tools and your process mysteriously running slowly. Instead, help them see where they could use it next. And, build a BPM solution for IT to use themselves!
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