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It's that time of year again to take a look back at the year that was. So in your opinion, what was the most significant development for BPM in 2013?
Theo Priestley Accepted Answer
Blog Writer
Peter Schooff joining BPM.com and resurrecting the forum.

Other than that it's been pretty much more of the same old this year. Just consolidation and evolution of strategy and a push towards integrating real-time analytics and data into process. But nothing I'd deem as significant.
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
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Hadi El-Khoury Accepted Answer
What I'm actively working on is putting BPM at the center stage of Cybersecurity and Cyberdefence.

I developed a PoC, called MindsetPimp, built on the jQuery framework. It forecasts the potential risk of a given business process. Individuals can map critical processes in Bonita BPM for example and then send data to SEKIMIA's software suite via an XML connector.

You can find more info here.

If interested and/or willing to push in this direction, please interact.
References
  1. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=xgHZ0oRo2Ns
  2. http://www.sekimia.com
Hadi El-Khoury
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  1. more than a month ago
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Steve Weissman Accepted Answer
Have to go with Theo on this one: not that anything went wrong, but nothing that caused me to sit up and say "wow!" either.

Two reasons for this that I can think of: (1) The technology is valuable but largely commodity, or (2) we've just become jaded after so many years in and around it!
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  1. more than a month ago
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E Scott Menter Accepted Answer
Blog Writer
Boring? Not a chance.

This was the year that cloud, mobile, social media, and BPM really began to converge. We'll see a lot more of that in 2014 and beyond, but this year saw the beginning of user understanding and adoption of this convergence. This is an exciting development because it marks the transition of BPM from a boring, back office technology to one that can actually help you embrace your customers by enabling them to participate directly in business processes. This shift is important for businesses, because of its potential to generate revenue, and important for the BPM industry, because it opens a whole new world of possible applications and customers.
http://www.bplogix.com/images/icon-x-medium.png Scott
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  1. more than a month ago
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David Chassels Accepted Answer
Agree with Theo; Peter getting this forum up and running as a thought leader for BPM is an important step. Early days and I see c 800 members and answers reaching 2000 views. Not afraid of the difficult questions and whilst not all in agreement the underlying message that "BPM" however defined will be the future of Enterprise Software just as Scott indicates. One observation from this year would be Adaptive capability now clearly associated with BPM and that BPMN may not be up to that job?

Asking good questions is how society moves on and for sure Enterprise Software long overdue for that "move" putting BPM as the driver. But asking questions need to go deeper to allow buyers to understand “how” not just “what” and I see that journey has started.

I know what capabilities we have created which after some 20 years R&D with the single focus on where people and machines created information and outcomes, gives me an insight to the future. For us survival awaiting the market to be ready has been our challenge and 2013 has been a milestone year in many respects. The foundation is laid that will see 2014 as the “wow” year; so Steve stay tuned…..!
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  1. more than a month ago
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