BPM.com
  1. Peter Schooff
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. Tuesday, November 26 2013, 09:45 AM
  4.  Subscribe via email
How important is process maturity to an enterprise, and if important, how can a company improve theirs?
Guest Accepted Answer
If we would regard process maturity to be measurable in three ways: predictability, alignment with customer expectations and adaptability/improvability, than its of the most importance for an enterprise. Process maturity can be improved by measuring these three KPI's and by showing and acting on the gap between measures and targets/strategy.
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 1
E Scott Menter Accepted Answer
Blog Writer
This is a good question, which I know because I've written on this topic in the past. :) (And, as an added bonus, that post happens to contain one of my favorite metaphors.)

As in life, there's no real shortcut to maturity, and no real rush, either. It comes when it comes. The best way to make sure you get there is to establish a strong foundation built on experience and success.
http://www.bplogix.com/images/icon-x-medium.png Scott
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 2
Theo Priestley Accepted Answer
Blog Writer
Ah, a favourite topic of mine - don't grow old chasing rainbows

The problem here is that for the most part analysts and consultants build these maturity models on constantly shifting sands; they are forever updating their own predictions and market definitions to the point that by the time you spend the required amount of money and expend the necessary blood, sweat and tears to get the medal of honour the enterprise world has moved on and so has the maturity model. The trouble is that they're aspirational and I've yet to meet any client who has gotten more than half way.

Don’t you feel a little like Sisyphus ?

Every organization is different, every business cannot possibly fit their ambitions and capabilities to match the curve and it’s definitely no bad thing to know that you can’t. Maturity models like this only exist to fuel spending, not your growth in real terms.

Don’t continually push that boulder up the maturity curve to watch it roll down the hill again a year later.
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 3
Derek Miers Accepted Answer
Very important ... as you may already know I just completed a major maturity survey of BPM related change programs (well where process is at the core). It was a repeat and extension of the survey I did in 2011 ... we explored the relationship with CX in more detail and also project success.

This year we only had 172 projects to explore (in 2011 it was 325). But it was enough to draw statistically significant conclusions. There are all sorts of points to get across here ...

1) The first point is that initial cost reduction objectives inevitably give way to delivering a better customer experience and innovating the value proposition.

2) Secondly - the much publicized figures of project failure are ... bunkem. These figures of 70%+ failure rate is just FUD. This is especially true when firms have relatively mature business architecture practices (primarily around project initiation and governance) ... 85% of these organization's projects either meet their stated expectations or exceed them. Only 5% have failed outright, and 11% said that although the project did not meet their initially stated goals, it delivered other benefits and was considered a success. These numbers are based on those people who gave a definitive outcome for their project (i.e. not including those who answered "It's too early to tell";).

There is a big "a ha" here - if you get good governance and business architecture practices around initiating projects, then you are far more likely to be able to predict success.

The 2013 survey results are in editing right now ... but I have a pre-edit version I am willing to share selectively.

Those who know me can send me an email ... Forrester clients will see it in a few weeks I am sure.
Comment
Completely agree with you, Derek.

I have yet to see one genuinely failed BPM process implementation. It may fail in terms of rigid metrics like cost savings or process float, but the side benefits are always much deeper.

Undertaking a BPM project to cut costs is like going on a drastic diet - you will quickly lose fat, with the risk of someting else breaking in the meanwhile.
Undertaking a BPM project to innovate the way you deliver value is like changing your lifestyle in order to stay slender and healthy.
  1. Bogdan Nafornita
  2. 3 years ago
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 4
David Chassels Accepted Answer
Niels hit the button as companies recognise the power of "measurement" which can empower people over the targets strategy which can often deliver the wrong results longer term, so process maturity will become meaningful.

Once business people have the confidence that the software technology has matured to "adaptive" that no longer has dependency on the old IT model by effectively commoditising business logic then this door will fly open and that road to maturity gets under way.

It will be a journey with no real end as processes will constantly change with no disruption as the business changes or just finding better ways to work as workers start to "own" their processes. However the "knowledge" belongs to the business. It is a win win for all.....except of course for old IT and the “command and control” managers?
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 5
Emiel Kelly Accepted Answer
Never had a customer that called me to ask how process mature my company is. No, they called when they could expect a product or they called to complain about a service.

I think I agree with Scott when I say 'Maturity is collateral damage, not a goal'

As long as my processes do what they promise to stakeholders, who cares if that is scored a 2 or a 5 on some kind of maturity scale?

Process management should be about giving your processes that kind of characteristics so that they perform well. And that can even differ from process to process. Some might have characteristics that are scored 'childish' and others might be scored 'elderly'. So what's the score for the enterprise then?

So an effective way of managing your processes,so that they deliver what you promise must be the goal.

Not winning the process maturity award 2013.
Common Sensei at Procesje.nl
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 6
Max J. Pucher Accepted Answer
Blog Writer
Process maturity ratings are only used to sell BPM consultancy.

I find the recommendation by both analysts and experts is to buy a BPM solution that fits the current maturity level particularly half-baked.

Does that mean that I switch to another product when my maturity level rises?

Process maturity rates how well a business implemented a rigid process management bureaucracy to create rigid processes!

Simply means: companies with process maturity level 5 are dead. One can't bureaucratize innovation and customer focus.
Comment
Max
Is there really a score card for maturity? Surely not.... if so planet Zog the step beyond FUD!
David
  1. David Chassels
  2. 3 years ago
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 7
Ron Webb Accepted Answer
From my perspective, the answer to this question depends on the return. Maturity for maturity's sake seems futile.

As an example, I've done a lot of benchmarking site visits to organizations that had process certifications, such as ISOxxxxx. Truth be told, they produced crappy products, but because of their certification, you be be assured they produce that crappy product the exact same way every time they produce it.

Same with maturity. Our members are VERY interested in maturity assessments, but not without understanding what the investment looks like to advance their maturity. They articulate that maturity is meaningless without understanding the real process outcomes they can expected from a cost, cycle time, and process efficiency perspective. That completes the picture for them and can allow them to make decisions on the level of maturity that is right for them.
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 8
"How important is process maturity to an enterprise" - all depends on the strategy of an enterprise; an example of explicit linking the strategy with enterprise capabilities (one of them is BPM, of course) - http://improving-bpm-systems.blogspot.com/2013/02/linking-business-strategy-and-it.html

"and if important, how can a company improve theirs?" - for example, http://improving-bpm-systems.blogspot.com/2013/09/enterprise-patterns-maturity-of-process.html

Thanks,
AS
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 9
Bogdan Nafornita Accepted Answer
I never asked myself what my business's process maturity should be. It is just a rigid framework for measuring yourself up.

A process mindset is the key ingredient. And by mindset I do not mean "thinking in flowchart terms", but understanding upstream and downstream roles, activities and needs. It all goes downhill from here, because it rewires the typical "what should I do better" into "what should I do improve the outcome of the whole process".
Managing Founder, profluo.com
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 10
Andy Houghton Accepted Answer
Perhaps I'm coming at this from a slightly different angle. I write animated training videos and for me, process is about freeing yourself up as much as you can so that time can be spent on creating your best work. I wrote a blog about how and why I think Process is Priceless.

I understand that "... for a process to be mature, it has to be complete in its usefulness, automated, reliable in information and continuously improving." from www.isixsigma.com but I also think there's an attitudinal aspect - the desire to keep getting a little bit better.
Comment
Andy, I agree with the quoted definition, except for the "automated" bit. I don't think we should judge process maturity by the degree of automation.
There are many processes that simply can't get automated - but this doesn't mean they are not useful, reliable or self-improving. Think of your own creative process, think of typical design processes, where you keep coming back to some ideas after you maybe killed them initially, where you reapply fresh knowledge to old design assets - this doesn't look too automated, but it's still effective (as in, it reaches its creative goals) and definitely mature.

Think of all those processes that end up with compensations or roll-backs - it usually takes the healthy judgement and sometimes the brave stance of some individuals to perform such activities, as they are delicate, risky and costly. This is hardly automatable.

For me, the true value of a process is proven when it supports high-value decisions with low transactional costs (and by costs I mean a whole range of downsides). The transactional part may be automated, but the high-value decisional part may not.
  1. Bogdan Nafornita
  2. 3 years ago
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 11
  • Page :
  • 1


There are no replies made for this post yet.
However, you are not allowed to reply to this post.