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Came across the following quote from Steve Towers on this podcast: "Customer Experience Management and BPM are one and the same." What do you think?

John Reynolds Accepted Answer
I'd say that BPM is essential for successful Customer Experience Management... but BPM is focussed on successful end to end processes, whereas CEM is focussed on the delight of a single (incredibly important) Persona across all your company's processes.
Comment
bingo
  1. Scott Francis
  2. 3 months ago
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Walter Bril Accepted Answer

Totally agree with John above:


BPM (or perhaps Business Process Knowledge Management) is IMO a fundamental enabler for CX.


For example, have you ever experienced that the company you bought that great new tool with, couldn't explain the status of your order? Or what about repeating your question, personal details over and over whenever you were transfered "to another department"?


So... They are not the same, but sound BPM (both technical *and* cultural) really helps, or better, is perhaps a precondition to accelerate in CX...
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  1. more than a month ago
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Patrick Lujan Accepted Answer
Blog Writer

No.
Comment
Patrick, you're an inspiration.
  1. John Morris
  2. 3 months ago
Sometimes brevity's best.
  1. Patrick Lujan
  2. 3 months ago
Wow, I never looked at it quite that way before.
  1. E Scott Menter
  2. 3 months ago
  1. more than a month ago
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I would say that at present, BPM handles, primarily, intra-enterprise (including end-to-end) processes. The next challenge for BPM is to handle also intra-business-entities processes. Thus CEM will be covered as well.

 

One scenario is: a company is one business-entity and each customer is another business-entity. Or B2B scenario. Or business-entity vs arbiter (e.g. lawyer, notary, etc.) vs business-entity.

 

BPM as a discipline has no problem with this challenge, but BPM-Suite tools have. The latter are too unique and lack the standardization.

 

As the result, other tools, e.g. smart contracts, are occupying the space between business-entities. See ref1 “Digital contract as a process enables business in the digital world”.

 

Thanks,

AS
References
  1. http://improving-bpm-systems.blogspot.ch/2016/07/digital-contract-as-process-enables.html
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  1. more than a month ago
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Scott Cleveland Accepted Answer
Your customer experience is a process and process management software will certainly help you improve it, but they are not the same.
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Emiel Kelly Accepted Answer
How well you execute and manage your cases by process, finally results in a (good or bad) customer experience.

So customer experience is the result of bpm.
Common Sensei at Procesje.nl
Comment
100% accurate on "customer experience is the result of bpm"

Reason:

BPM lets you evolve "best practice" processes.

Without BPM, you are likely to end up with a less-than-best process and to the extent that this impacts a customer (not all process directly impact customers) your CEM ranking goes down.

We can even preserve the link BPM -> CEM when there are no structured steps at a Case (i.e. each step is, except in the minds of the actors, totally separate from all other steps),

The link "works" because an ad hoc step can be declared to be a "process of one step".

All Case interventions are "processes".
  1. karl walter keirstead
  2. 3 months ago
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David Chassels Accepted Answer

No....pity such statements made just adds to confusion as to what BPM actually is! Yes BPM will certainly contribute to enhancement of customer experience but does a lot more....with fewer managers...!
Comment
Somebody, somewhere (usually vendors and consultants) are always trying to hype something new or put a new spin on something old for purposes of a sale. That includes terminology and concepts. Reality is though, unfortunately, most don't even get the fundamentals right.
  1. Patrick Lujan
  2. 3 months ago
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Rick Willis Accepted Answer

CEM is an implemenation of BPM. I agree with Emiel that the output of a good implemenation is a good customer experience. My question back is how are you currently measuring the success or failure of your process?
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Peter Whibley Accepted Answer

No. Customer experience is subjective. Customer experience is the sum of all the interactions an individual has with an organization and includes customer service.





BPM is closer however to customer service management. We all work in customer service. Your customer could be someone inside your organization waiting for you to complete a task as well as someone looking to purchase your product or looking for a repair. Customer service and customer service processes thus exist both inside and outside organizations. BPM enables and optimizes the delivery of customer service. Thus BPM and Customer Service are one and the same not customer experience.
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Bogdan Nafornita Accepted Answer

I agree with Peter Whibley and I'd build on the fact the the sum of the interactions an individual has with an organization is always greater than the sum of processes that have customer touch points. One typical example (sadly overlooked by the vast majority of BPM players) is interfaces: how many interfaces are friendly enough, explanatory enough, helpful enough and intelligent enough that they serve the customer a great experience?


I mean, look at intranet portals. I'm sure people could draft a research paper revealing statistically significant correlation between intranet portals and employee attrition, productivity and suicidal tendencies.
Managing Founder, profluo.com
Comment
Re:

"the sum of the interactions an individual has with an organization is always greater than the sum of processes that have customer touch points."

Precisely,

which reinforces the point I am making below that you don't get to CEM unless a customer can do inreach whenever they want and a supplier can do outreach whenever it wants.

A good example of the solid need for inreach/outreach is in custom private aircraft finishing - the folks who place the orders and spend a few millions on top of a base price of many more millions are very demanding.

(i.e. they ask questions, they want action/responses; they want change orders included in their order, they don't want to hear that requested changes cannot be accommodated).

The supplier needs to be responsive - it's in their interest for a couple of big reasons

a) mis-reading order details can result in the need for a lot of re-work, typically at the expense of the supplier. (best to reach out if there is any doubt about what next to do or how).

b) incoming change orders increase project revenue.

Managing this type of job-shop busieness really needs 24 x7 two-way communication.

You cannot get to CEM if you have to anticipate inreach/outreach.
  1. karl walter keirstead
  2. 3 months ago
Don't... get... me... started... on... portals, or Intranets. Fortune 20, #epicfailure. 'Nuff said.
  1. Patrick Lujan
  2. 3 months ago
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Depends on the definition for "BPM" being used.


If BPM is a methodology for "managing" the building and updating of BPM flowgraphs, then BPM and CEM are
[b]NOT [/b]
the same. Many describe this scope of activity as "managing processes".


If BPM is a methodology for "managing processes" (i.e. read - building and updating BPM flowgraphs, compiling the graphs to yield templates, being able to stream a relational database record onto a template to generate a private instance in a run-time Case Management environment, then managing that process instance plus any number of ad hoc interventions at the Case), then, yes, BPM and CEM
[b]ARE [/b]
the same.


Here, you can have embedded customer reachout at any plan-side step in a process and you can, at the run-time Case environment, insert any number of ad hoc customer reachout steps.


Inreach is more complicated.


I can explain why if anyone is interested.


 
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  1. more than a month ago
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John Morris Accepted Answer

Beyond the CEM=BPM equation, the original interview is worth a listen. Through the dialogue one gets a sense of lots of engineering and scientific context. And the quotes on interview webpage are worth the price of admission.


In the interview, by BPM evangelist [url="https://twitter.com/zmisiak"]Zbigniew Misiak[/url], Steve Towers' comments on leadership are especially compelling -- and even challenging, in that according to Steve, 
[u]successful outcomes are not based on asking customers what they want[/u]
. (Henry Ford's quip about customers wanting "faster horses" is shared to good effect.)


Providing
[u]pragmatic process-oriented leadership[/u]
to a place of better outcomes (according to Towers, it's all about customer experience) requires one 
[u]must deeply understand the customer's work[/u]
 and objectives. When we sell BPM technology and BPM solutions,
[i]are we sure we know where that knowledge of the fundamentals of work and process are coming from[/i]
?
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  1. more than a month ago
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Ian Gotts Accepted Answer

I wrote a regular column for PEXNEtwork called "My Angry - call that Customer Service". It was stories of good and bad CX. At the heart of almost all of them was a lack of well defined and followed process. Mostly it was poor design. Often it was poor execution.


So exceptional CX requires process thinking...BPM (
[i]BPM the approach, not the software)[/i]



 
References
  1. http://old.processexcellencenetwork.com/columnists/mr-angry-you-call-that-customer-service/
Comment
Sure,

Fail to do the right things, the right way, using the right resources, at the right time, and you get a low score on CEM.

However, no amount of process thinking can replace the need for ad hoc (run-time) interventions (incoming and outgoing).

It follows that anyone who wants good CEM needs to get a BPMs that can handle any mix of structured and unstructured interventions in customer/supplier relationships.
  1. karl walter keirstead
  2. 3 months ago
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Scott Francis Accepted Answer
Blog Writer

Late to the party and everyone already answered it so well : )


Great read -
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  1. more than a month ago
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Guest Accepted Answer

Business handle administration (BPM) is an optimistic, developing center competency for client encounter administration (CEM) ventures, most client experience experts need adequate familiarity with how BPM teach and advancements can bolster client driven business prepare change.
References
  1. https://www.docup.in/
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