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  1. Peter Schooff
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  3. Tuesday, December 08 2015, 09:53 AM
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Taking a look back at the year almost past, what development in IT in the past year do you think will have the biggest impact on BPM going forward?
Patrick Lujan Accepted Answer
Blog Writer

Decisioning maturity, including DMN. Abstracting that out of the process to provide true flexibility (and, operationally and technically both, some do it better than others), will provide an at-large boost to the people already in flight. Rising tide and all that.
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 1
Ian Gotts Accepted Answer

Adoption of cloud for enterprise critical apps and storage by EVERY industry - including those who we thought would never migrate; Government, & Financial Services.


It has also had the most pround impact on the IT department. They have gone from being gatekeepers to sheep herders deperately trying to stay ahead of and control the herd of cloud apps..
Comment
Cloud definitely had the biggest impact on MY processes.

Still can't find back around 70% of my cases...
  1. Emiel Kelly
  2. 12 months ago
That's an ideal I don't think is going to be realized. There are those in the financial industry, particularly here in the "middle" who are very wary of the cloud still.
  1. Patrick Lujan
  2. 12 months ago
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Nigel Kilpatrick Accepted Answer

The most signifant development in 2015 and for the foreseeable future is low code process development. The impact to IT is that the ease of use of the new generation of low code vendors will put the power of form creation, process automation and workflow into the hands of business users. This is changing the dynamic of process custondianship which is long, long overdue.
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I agree -- with Patrick, that low code doesn't scale. Having sold RAD successfully ("Magic", when the big four RAD tools were Progress, PowerBuilder, Delphi and Magic) this is a topic of concern to me. Low-code tools, along with templates (and even BPM) are amazingly powerful now!

But I believe that there's a fundamental flaw in the idea that business people should build their own IT tools, at least beyond the basics. The idea underestimates the semantic and syntactical content of good software, the cognitive load required to learn software development, to execute software development (especially including exception handling) -- and assumes, incorrectly, that business people have any time to do this or that they are or could be paid to do this.

They don't (have time) and they aren't (paid to do it). The funding of software development remains a "wicked" governance issue.

Interestingly, part of the solution is ERP and/or channels (Progress combined RAD with channels for a huge success of course).
  1. John Morris
  2. 12 months ago
Disagree. Low code in the hands of neophytes doesn't scale. If it doesn't go well it leaves a bad taste in their mouth, they're put off by it and don't go further.
  1. Patrick Lujan
  2. 12 months ago
Hi John, thanks for your thoughtful response. The main question being discussed is whether a solution such as Project Management or BPM requires coding to be useful.

Let's take for granted that a Work breakdown structure (WBS) is essential for a Project Management solution to be useful (I happen not to believe that a WBS is necessary for all projects, but let's take that as an assumption).

Now, in the article you cited, Microsoft Project is cited as a tool that does support WBS. However Microsoft Project does not require coding to be useful.

So, in fact, if anything, the article supports the notion that coding is not necessary for something like Project Management. (the article's main point is comparing older on-premise/desktop solutions with more recent SaaS solutions. This is entirely orthogonal to the code-required-or-not question.

Now, back to BPM. My basic contention is that you have two kinds of BPM systems from the point of view of whether coding is required or not, viz. zero-code and non-zero-code.

The non-zero-code BPM systems have the same (software development) skill requirements and (long) lead times as regular apps. So, basically they are really in competition with traditional app development. It's no surprise that most non-zero-code BPM systems are evolving into specialized app development platforms.

zero-code BPM systems on the other hand put the power into the hands of the actual business user. This has huge advantages over apps/non-zero-code BPM systems in terms of massively reduced cycle times, process learning, rapid process optimization and utilization by a much larger audience.

So, then the question further reduces to whether a zero-code BPM system is useful (or significantly more useful than the alternatives, viz. email, spreadsheets, project mgmt, document sharing for the purposes of process managment). In my opinion the answer is an unambiguous yes.

Our (https://tmail21.com) Lean BPM customers are all business users who have typically never defined a formal process before in their life. Most are not even terribly familiar with the traditional BPM market. They are defining and iterating on dozens of lean processes. If you are interested I can further expand on the type of processes they are building.

Now clearly, if an obviously superior app or coded-bpm-solution existed for their needs, they would probably use those systems. But the whole point is that these apps or coded-bpm-solutions don't exist and they don't have the time, funds or inclination to commission the building of an app or having a BPM solution coded up.

At the end of the day, I see both approaches coexisting. Zero-code BPM systems will address the hitherto unaddressed mass market with simpler capabilities. The Non-zero-code BPM systems and traditional app vendors will duke it out for the high-end market.

Further reading on our philosophy: https://tmail21.com/lean-bpm-manifesto/
  1. Ranjit Notani
  2. 12 months ago
Ranjit, you make some good points about low-code. But your mention of the popular low-end SaaS-based project management tool Basecamp highlights the problem of what might be called "amateur software development" - which is software by non-specialists.

Last time I checked the product in question had only a flat task model - ie no work breakdown structure (WBS). (If I'm incorrect I apologize and withdraw these comments.)

No WBS undermines the usefulness of any PM or collaboration product - completely, to my mind, for anything worth organizing.

In fact "no WBS" is typical of many low end PM and colkaboration packages. And reflects both inadequate domain understanding (business analysis) and computer science (hierarchies).

For the reason explored, I offer this is a good example of the dangers of low code - and this was a commercial product!

More info:

http://mightybuxx.blogspot.ca/2013/06/work-breakdown-structure-and-project.html
  1. John Morris
  2. 12 months ago
Couldn't agree more. On the one hand it is true that business users aren't going to write code. But why does BPM have to involve code in the first place? An even more radical alternative to "Low Code" is the concept of "Code Later". In this approach, the business user can create and iterate on processes rapidly without any code. Only once a process has been stabilized (in Lean terminology, "validated learning" has taken place) can integration code be added if warranted. This integration code would be written by I.T. and be non-disruptive to the business user.

There are many precedents for solutions that went from the realm of I.T./specialists to general business users. Some precedents are Basecamp for Project Management, the Electronic Spreadsheet for calculations, Zapier for integration etc. Speaking of Zapier, it (or a service like it) has the potential to make even the code-later integration a non-coding activity!

This link expands on these ideas:

https://tmail21.com/blog/zero-code-bpm-is-not-a-myth/
  1. Ranjit Notani
  2. 12 months ago
Alexander, I agree that these are two somewhat distinct viewpoints. I think both viewpoints make sense, but are applicable in different situations.

The viewpoint you cite suggests that an enterprise has well-defined goals and business processes are a means to achieve these goals.

I can see this latter viewpoint being valuable in industries and companies which are not facing rapidly changing environments (possibly due to rapid growth, rapid market evolution, rapid changes in competitive landscape, etc.). Highly regulated industries like regulated utilities come to mind.

In companies being faced with a rapidly changing environment, the former viewpoint might be more valuable. Processes need to be constantly improved due to the rapidly changing environment. Processes also need to be constantly evolved to better fit changing conditions (a form of improvement).
  1. Ranjit Notani
  2. 12 months ago
Ranjit, your manifesto defines BPM as "a methodology that facilitates process improvement...". There is also a viewpoint that BPM is a discipline for the better management of the enterprise functioning in support of the enterprise goals via using business processes. These two viewpoints are rather different.
  1. Dr Alexander Samarin
  2. 12 months ago
Ranjit, fortunately, processes are more than classic flowcharts. Processes are "allowed" to use various coordination techniques ( see http://improving-bpm-systems.blogspot.ch/2014/03/coordination-techniques-in-bpm.html ). In particular, processes are very useful for "a rapidly changing environment" because they allow companies to adapt proven process fragments (or practical process patterns which implement good business practices).
Thus staff members can concentrate on the unique challenges of their business and not waste time re-inventing the wheel.
  1. Dr Alexander Samarin
  2. 11 months ago
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Garth Knudson Accepted Answer
Blog Writer

As BPM becomes a de facto app dev platform there will be more out-of-the-box and packaged APIs and web services for customers to buy/leverage to integrate their respective BPM solutions with EDMS, CRM, ERP and legacy systems. Through the solution development life-cycle there will be a questions about proper governance and security. I see an opportunity for the enterprise integration platform as a service (enterprise iPaaS) and application services governance products dovetailing with BPM to address these questions.



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  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 4

Blockchain





Thanks,


AS
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Absolutely. Most people relate blockchain to digitial money. But blockchain is so much more: It eliminates human emotion in areas where you don't want emotion to play a role. Imagine the impact of such a (still) developing technology on business models...
  1. Walter Bril
  2. 12 months ago
Although, that being said, I'm kind of viewing blockchain as the xref table in Volker Stiehl's process driven architecture. Whaddaya think?
  1. Patrick Lujan
  2. 12 months ago
"We'll see" said the Zen master. We'll see.
  1. Patrick Lujan
  2. 12 months ago
Patrick, I think "xref table" is about idempotency.
  1. Dr Alexander Samarin
  2. 12 months ago
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  3. # 5
Alberto Manuel Accepted Answer
Blog Writer

IoT - Internet of Things.


By modernizing the architecture of IT systems and interconnecting devices and people you can quickly and cheaply increase the flow of information and enhance the interaction across partners or customers. This allows you to monitor devices from remote locations arming the enterprise with sufficient and necessary information to realign the efforts of the entire enterprise ecosystem to proactively offer new services or business models.



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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 6
Bogdan Nafornita Accepted Answer

I just came here to agree to everything Patrick has said until now:
[b]yes[/b]
to business rules and
[i]DMN[/i]
,
[b]no[/b]
to the
[i]low-code[/i]
discourse,
[b]hmm[/b]
to the
[i]blockchain[/i]
perspective of the xref of Stiehl.


I would only add
[i]open source[/i]
that will be the knight in the shining armour for the honest BPMS movement in 2016. With that in mind, I wish to all the BPMS vendors that have implemented proprietary scripting languages in their suites... their own very special Blackberry torture.
Managing Founder, profluo.com
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Dood, you slay me. "Very special Blackberry torture." Oresome.

And yeah, I'm watching BonitaSoft, Camunda, Effektif amongst others.
  1. Patrick Lujan
  2. 12 months ago
Ditto.
  1. John Morris
  2. 12 months ago
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Peter Whibley Accepted Answer

Although technically it was launched in 2014, Microsoft’s speech recognition application Cortana was included in their 2015 Windows 10 platform and is important from a BPM perspective. It was important because now we have three of largest global IT organizations — Apple, Google and Microsoft — all offering voice recognition software. So why do we have this sudden interest in voice recognition? The answer lies with the IoT and ultimately the ability to initiate processes using voice commands. Voice recognition is my pick for the biggest impact on BPM in 2015.



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  1. more than a month ago
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Walter Bril Accepted Answer

Alexander already said it. Blockchain by far. It'll take some time (e.g., performance wise 2015 is still not there) but the it's a fundamental (and dare I say needed) gamechanging technology IMO. Imagine exchanging (process) knowledge that way...
Comment
Can't wait for buzzword bingo on the Tw^tter and elsewhere to hit. Maybe it'll have the longevity of the case management fanbois.
  1. Patrick Lujan
  2. 12 months ago
I am not up to snuff with blockchain, I understand the benefits of the tech, but I don't know what's the compelling reason to buy from a customer standpoint.

Yes, perfect compliance, perfect traceability etc etc. None of these have come up as compelling problems to be solved by a BPMS (only via blockchain) in my talks to customers, big and small.
  1. Bogdan Nafornita
  2. 12 months ago
Yeah, definitely :-). But doesn't that kind of (mostly commercial) hijacking always happen?
  1. Walter Bril
  2. 12 months ago
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  3. # 9
KM Mukku Accepted Answer

1) The Case wars will be back. But, not because of the usual reasons of the efficacy or otherwise of Case. It will be driven by the pressures to move away from the heirarchical structure in organisations. This will bring goall-oriented processes to the fore and drag Case back into the fray.


2) Agree with Patrick, cloud will not set BPM on fire, except in a few selective domains. As in HRM, particularly if the need to speedup the selction and hiring process will include the use of the social network.


3) As mentioned by Walter Bril, Blockchain will be stymied by performance and the trusted partner role. Maybe like private cloud this is will only be tried out in large enterprises.
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  1. more than a month ago
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David Chassels Accepted Answer







2015 has at last seen the start of serious commentary on “the low code” software development. This something we have researched and addressed; Nigel is spot on! It will be/is highly disruptive but as indicated by some responses we are still at the “ridicule” stage but at least now acknowledged!


The other “BPM” linked move is “digital” where the customary industry hype is now facing reality that to deliver requires addressing business operational needs. The “low code” adaptive capability does just that but remember legacy is the slave to this new way. 2015 sets the scene for this paradigm shift in coming years putting business back in control of their operational processes…..long over due!



Comment
Bogdan
Yes all catered for and more....actually incredibly simple with the right architecture which incorporates all business requirements. Might need coder for sophisticated calculations/algorithms but otherwise business professional builds thinking BPM
  1. David Chassels
  2. 12 months ago
I am looking forward to the first low-code solution, this way I can manage my software business without software developers!

Oh, and that low-code solution needs to:
- address all possible exceptions that would cross any business-minded person, trained or not in BPM methodology;
- have connectors to any kind of legacy IT systems that are too expensive or too slow to change;
- figure out what to do when users are using script blockers in their browsers, when they change IPs because of hunting a better wi-fi in the airport, when they change their minds in the middle of a task, when their device battery dies etc etc.
  1. Bogdan Nafornita
  2. 12 months ago
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 11

Some extra ideas about blockchain for BPM ... and for your critique.


Each process instance (more precisely a pool in accordance with BPMN) becomes a self-secured on-demand microcloud which:

[list]
[*]
is built on-demand from several microservices (some data are kept within this microcloud)
[*]
has a limited set of stakeholders: direct participants, indirect participants (e.g. customers), controlling bodies, governing bodies
[*]
operates in the ways that each action is secured via blockchain technology (signed by some stakeholders)
[*]
instantiated on-demand microservices in accordance with process-instance evolution
[*]
secures microservices dynamically at their instantiation (see 6.3 in[url="http://improving-bpm-systems.blogspot.de/2015/04/architecting-cloud-friendly-application.html"]http://improving-bpm-systems.blogspot.de/2015/04/architecting-cloud-friendly-application.html[/url]) - each mcroservice (instance) is just binary data
[*]
may admit (via IoT) some sensors (physical world to digital world adapters) and “materialisers” (digital world to physical world adapters) - of course if they understand BPM
[*]
is fully digital
[*]
is virtual
[/list]


Note that each process instance (i.e. microcloud) may be connected with some other process instances (i.e. microcloud).


Thus, for each individual client it will be possible to have an individual process instance which is built in accordance with the client’s needs and behaviours and which is fully secured for this client. (see my comment to [url="http://bpm.com/bpm-today/in-the-forum/by-2017,-will-70-percent-of-successful-digital-business-models-rely-on-unstable-processes"]http://bpm.com/bpm-today/in-the-forum/by-2017,-will-70-percent-of-successful-digital-business-models-rely-on-unstable-processes[/url] )


A real-life example – fans on a stadium during a football match. Perfect peak performance case which can be economically reasonable only via on-demand provisioning of processes and micro-services.


I think, healthcare could be another example.


An updated version is available at [url="http://improving-bpm-systems.blogspot.ch/2015/12/synergy-between-bpm-digital-iot.html"]http://improving-bpm-systems.blogspot.ch/2015/12/synergy-between-bpm-digital-iot.html[/url]


Thanks,

AS
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 12
Anna Davis Accepted Answer

I think the biggest solutions are solutions with [url="https://www.bpmonline.com/crm-products"]CRM software[/url]. This sphere is trully developing from day to day! And the next year this connection will have more opportunities!y
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 13
Frank Murdy Accepted Answer

I think so too! Especially that I can find a huge number of different services such as ([url="https://www.zoho.com"]https://www.zoho.com[/url]) and ([url="http://customertimes.com/services/salesforce-com-implementation/"]http://customertimes.com/services/salesforce-com-implementation/[/url]) and ([url="http://www.sugarcrm.com/products/editions-and-pricing"]http://www.sugarcrm.com/products/editions-and-pricing[/url]) etc. on the Internet. Which helps me simplify work of my e-store. Also it is help me analyze quality of sales department better.
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