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It seems a given that we are entering the age of the digital business. So how important are processes and BPM to the future of the digital enterprise?






Faun deHenry Accepted Answer
Blog Writer

My $0.02


BPM is important for the enterprise. Being "digital" or moving toward "digital" doesn't change the importance of BPM. It only changes how an organization might deploy it or use it.
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  1. more than a month ago
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Stuart Chandler Accepted Answer
Blog Writer

How important is a foundation to a house, building or physical structure ? How important is electricity, plumbing etc to the a household.. No question BPM is the foundation, the glue and more importantly, the orchestration of the digital enterprise. BPM will help digitize the organization but the real driver is how to tie together the systems of customer touch and the systems of core data and transactions to deliver a seamless customer experience... not to mention enable organizations to move into the landscape of constant change.
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Oooh... that left an aftertaste. I think it's Kool-Aid.
  1. Patrick Lujan
  2. 1 year ago
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Peter Johnston Accepted Answer


Digital is your Dad's tech. It hit most of us back in 1983, with the launch of the CD.


Entering the age of Digital Business back in the eighties led to exponential growth for some big, aggressive organisations too. These were companies built on "Pushing Tin" hard sell methodologies and originally about selling hardware.


Having built large, voracious corporations to serve other large corporations, they needed a large, solid revenue stream. As computer hardware commoditised, they moved into software, buying up every company they could think of and turning it into products in their portfolio.


This led to the golden age of enterprise software. The gold, of course, was what they took from everyone with lock-in contracts and confusopoly pricing based on users and CPUs. New acronyms tumbled out of their marketing departments by the truckload - ERP, CRM, BI... and even BPM.


The methodology is simple. They know that if something looks simple, even if it isn't, you can't charge much for it. The trick is to create something which is simple to do, but looks hard and complex - then you can charge lots of money for consultancy fees, make fortunes as gurus attending conferences etc. Theirs is the cult of the magician or alchemist - smoke and mirrors.


I watched this happen with IBM BPM - they turned a simple "sort it in 6 weeks for £50k" product (Lombardi) into one with pricing so complex it took 3 days just to create a quote. Instead of a small to mid-market product it became a banks and "governance is a problem" companies only.


That was the Digital Age. Now we've reached the Data Age.


Companies are being increasingly driven by data. Not the old, expensive, inflexible DataWarehouses of the Enterprise Software era but easily connected fast datastreams which learn and enable agile processes. Not Agile as in big fixed methodology Agile, either, but systems which create a product and service proposition according to the history of the person who is asking, location, time of day (and their shoe size if it is in the algorithm)... balancing stock, creating dynamic pricing, choosing preferred delivery options - the possibilities are endless; even feeding all the data back into a machine learning process to continually improve and adapt.


In this environment the sort of BPM most of us are used to is like a Model T sat next to a McLaren. Old, slow, manual and uneconomical. 


But does it mean process is redundant? Far from it. Process is actually what is driving this agile, responsive software. The system needs to know, in real time, what the options are - process. To make sure things happen in sequence where that is right, in parallel when it isn't - process. To use data to make informed decisions - process. To build a feedback loop which informs the process at every level on its performance, the gap to optimal and the options for improvement - process. Process is at the heart of the AI age.


It is time for BPM 2.0. And this time we need to keep the enterprise software companies out of the loop.

Dynamic Process
Oxfordshire, UK
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peter@dynamicprocess.uk
Comment
+1 for "this time we need to keep the enterprise software companies out of the loop". If your vendor is selling you BPM the way they sell you heavyweight, monolithic suites like ERP, be afraid. Be very afraid. As I've mentioned in this forum and elsewhere (and in spite of the fact that I'm too lazy to go back and find the links), BPM is best deployed bottom-up. This may be a new idea for many CIOs: start solving problems first and worry about how to tie it all together later. But its one whose time has come.
  1. E Scott Menter
  2. 1 year ago
I honestly don't know what's driving what right now. I think there's a cart and horse, dog and tail problem in the industry at large right now with customers rushing towards solutions (and vendors) without necessarily knowing what the problem they're trying to solve or solution to deliver is. They're just afraid they're missing out or being left behind and the vendors are more than happy to fuel that fear.
  1. Patrick Lujan
  2. 1 year ago
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  3. # 3
Maria Paz Accepted Answer

If the question had been "Is BPM important to Digital Enterprises", the question would've been pretty obvious: YES.


A Digital Enterprise has processes (like any other organization) and that's why BPM is as important for them as for any enterprise.


The beauty of this question lies in the HOW. How important, you're asking? Very. Many digital enterprises start with just a few employees, quite small and simple and boom, next thing you know they have hundreds of employees, are very successful but also feel overwhelmed by the amount of processes that grew too quickly for them to even realize.


That's why, as I said in [url="http://www.flokzu.com/en/smes/what-is-bpm/"]one of my posts[/url], Small or Medium Enterprises (and at the beginning, Digital Enterprises are usually that) should worry the most about its business processes in order to grow faster. No organization should postpone this issue until it's too late because then the solution might not be as simple.
References
  1. http://www.flokzu.com/en
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  1. more than a month ago
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David Chassels Accepted Answer

Absolutely vital...once IT and Business realise it is about business operations not just a fancy web interface! This will place BPM thinking asthe driver but will need clever supporting software platforms that addresses all requirements including that vital orchestration of legacy as required.

 

Adaptive capability is a must in this dynamic environment and really willchange Enterprise Software for ever and for the better...at last!
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  1. more than a month ago
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Emiel Kelly Accepted Answer

BPM is always important, but I have no clue what's a digital enterprise.
Common Sensei at Procesje.nl
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 6

What is a digital enterprise? Have a look at “#entarch view on #digital” in ref1 which starts with the statement “Business artefacts are available in digital formats (formal and executable)”. Thus BPM (as a full set of model, implement/automate, execute, control, measure, optimise) is mandatory to become digital.


Thanks,

AS


 


 
References
  1. http://improving-bpm-systems.blogspot.ch/2015/03/entarch-view-on-ditigal.html
Comment
"Business artefacts are available in digital formats" -- i.e. the subjects of business interest become first class citizens of the technologies of business.

This statement is a call-to-arms for what needs to be done. The brevity of the statement is powerful; the statement is also easy to overlook in the clouds of dust which swirl around technology futurism and change.

Here's an example: A "task", or more specifically "calculating insurance risk, performed by an underwriter, on the basis of scoring and additional research", are defined "in some degree" with sufficient formality to permit machine assistance.

This is what we've all been doing with technology from day one; the difference now is that the translation of business artefacts becomes programmatic and explicit and using tools where the representations of artefacts are first class citizens of the system.
  1. John Morris
  2. 1 year ago
  1. more than a month ago
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John Morris Accepted Answer

Looks like a consensus that "BPM is important to enterprise", but there's a question as to what the word "digital" adds to the word enterprise.


Being very specific helps to get beyond the generality of "enterprise". For example, "servitization" (turning a product into a service, and then not sitting on your laurels, but continuing to improve that service) is a new type of general business model which has been enabled by cheap, tiny devices. There are other genres of "digitization", many of which involve ever larger numbers of "things" talking to each other. Presumably the various flavours of digitization involve the use of technology that helps us get more work done.


If digitization isn't to be just hype or magical thinking, we need details, both business details and technical details. And as everyone has already noted, BPM is very likely the right technology for much of the job.



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  1. more than a month ago
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Anatoly Belaychuk Accepted Answer
Blog Writer

I can see two aspects in the Digital business movement: external and internal. BPM is vital for the internal part - all processes must be externalized and wrapped with APIs, certain culture must be in place etc. Yet more important is probably the external part - the opportunities on the border between digital and physical worlds: all these sensors, smarphone apps that are always online, wearables etc. BPM won't give the clue how to prosper in this brave new world - it 'only' creates the key capability that make it possible. Is it much? Well it may sound disappointing for those obsessed with the 'quick win' idea but the truth is that one can't do anything of transformational scale without mature BPM capabilities. And Digital is transformational of course.
Comment
It's a matter of definitions I guess. I follow BPM CBOK approach here that says "if it's not disruptive then it's not a transformation".
  1. Anatoly Belaychuk
  2. 1 year ago
RE "the truth is that one can't do anything of transformational scale without mature BPM capabilities" – my experience is slightly different. Both enterprise-wide-transformation and building BPM capabilities can be done incrementally with the pace of a particular client (if a proper architecture is used).

Thanks,
AS
Very interesting choice of words in addressing "external and internal". Is it really all about the opportunities at the "border between digital and physical worlds"?

Prospering in this "brave new world"... a severely ironic comparison to Huxley's vision. Such is the tempest - representing the worst in humanity (Shakespeare).

I agree we're looking at a disruptive transformation. Problem is that we're being taken back in the wrong direction if measured against human-evolutionary progress. This is the case though if we're talking about neo-barbarism (per your reference). Our digital enterprise lacks physicality; unencumbered by Human appendage. The soul then left behind at the physical border. So be our sacrifice.



P.S. Admittedly off-topic but couldn't resist highlighting your reference and sly irony.
  1. Gary Samuelson
  2. 1 year ago
RE “we're looking at a disruptive transformation” But, disruptive for whom? Disruptive for customers? Disruptive for employees? Disruptive for competitors? Disruptive for everyone? I would prefer to architect a transformation which is seamless for employees, appreciated by customers and disruptive for competitors.
Noting that I don't necessarily subscribe to this philosophy but acknowledge its unavoidable presence. I think our sub-topic takes its turn towards the "Singularity Hypotheses" (Eden, Amnon H, et al).

Who benefits on this slide towards human oblivion? Obviously the winning team - in this example the ones in stable orbit. Goal being not to fall in while benefiting from the weight, mass, and thrown off energy.

What to do as a BPM/Architectural specialist?

I recommend sturdy yet agile information systems. Sufficiently robust to handle churning infrastructure while offering just enough flexibility (disposable also an option). I'm thinking of hybrid systems capable of forming both composite and aggregate structures. In real-terms, I think this is pointing towards cloud-based services and infrastructure.

Process management (as a system) then aggregates (yes... ACM) while keep just enough cohesion (BPM) to for a steady keel. Agreeing with the need for both a seamless and agile architecture supporting optimal application of human effort towards business value.
  1. Gary Samuelson
  2. 1 year ago
Very quickly adding (and then rushing back to my digital business...)

I did track down "micro-devices" and "cloud computing references" - yes. I like that definition.

Currently working from cloud systems. Very different approach on tasks (in-process). And, also taking a different turn on architecture.
  1. Gary Samuelson
  2. 1 year ago
re: (from your link) Digital business: "it is about taking away manual, repetitive tasks from the workers and allowing them to focus on more important things, which cannot all be accomplished by the machines" (Gartner).

Digital business is more than automation. Though removing "manual repetitive tasks" does improve both worker's quality and efficiency. I was thinking about something more in line with the methods of profiting from the digital ecosystem.

For example, the selling of on-line user's behavior or shopping habits. And, large scale social engineering for political/economic gain. This is the rarefied form of digital business - in a sense defining a different economy.

"Big data" is also a very good example. Though somewhat in-line with automation... thinking of the impossibility of manually sifting through terabytes of information as an impossibility - so, not necessarily "automation". This is more evolutionary.

Another very good example is artificial sensory enhancements - and then profiting from these new abilities. Alternate reality created with heads-up (in eye-glasses) changes our visual world and consequently changes the way we work. Information is assembled and brought forward into context of perception. Perception then effected, work methods evolve accordingly.
  1. Gary Samuelson
  2. 1 year ago
For example, "Architecting #cloud-friendly application architecture #apparch (inspired by #microservices)" http://improving-bpm-systems.blogspot.ch/2015/04/architecting-cloud-friendly-application.html
RE ' Digital business is more than automation. Though removing "manual repetitive tasks" does improve both worker's quality and efficiency. I was thinking about something more in line with the methods of profiting from the digital ecosystem. ' Agree. Almost all my documents are digital since 1982 but even now I have to print some of them. I transformed one of my clients into fully electronic work but to achieve the real gain of digital artefacts the value stream of the whole organisation-in-big (including many partners) needed to be changed.
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 9
Bogdan Nafornita Accepted Answer

The problem with pure digital enterprises (whoever they are) is that most bits and pieces of them will become easily fragmented and then comoditized, as open-source software matures and becomes more and more a solid solution rather than a cool curiosity.


Ad insertion technology? Someone else than Google has it as well. Deep learning routines? Already a reality in open-source. ERP? BPM? CRM? OS? Document Management? Middleware (VM, DBMS, ESB)? Very powerful open-source alternatives are already eating the proprietary space at an increasing pace.


So a digital enterprise has two ways of digging competitive moats around itself:


1/ orchestrate the already comoditized bits and pieces with a powerful entarch concept and a lean "director";


2/ mesh the digital pieces with physical pieces that create enough "margin friction" and value for the customers.


In both cases: say hello to BPM technology as the key enabler.
Managing Founder, profluo.com
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 10
Gary Samuelson Accepted Answer

[b]First addressing our definition of The Digital Enterprise:[/b]



Trade and industry built from an electronic ecosystem whereby mutually dependent human-oriented service and information systems work together towards the delivery of business value. Definition of Value as being something measured, quantified, and eventually purchased (paid for).


Initially agreeing with Dr. Alexander's definition (above) but then I didn't find any reciprocation - in lacking the critical "mutual" or symbiotic relationship (HCI, Ux).


[i][quote][b]So, how important is BPM to the digital enterprise? [/b]
[/i][/quote]


This new model merges business and technology into a single composite organization mutually supporting the production of actionable information alongside trade. Human-oriented service and information systems, now dependent, places what was previously unforeseen demands on technical capabilities.


Key point being that technology and business are now one entity in their delivery of value (services) into today’s market. Bringing this fact to light is the
[b]recognition of “process” being a core business asset[/b]
. The immaterial nature of Information (IoT), and its trade, force this perspective.


Maintaining relevance now requires an increasingly focused model and drive towards market-driven delivery time-lines. BPM tools and frameworks are therefore a core requirement for the Digital Enterprise.
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 11
Walter Bril Accepted Answer

Separated from the discussion about what it means to be a digital enterprise, here are my 2cts.


Being currently part of an organization that sells enterprise software (DMS/RMA and Case Management systems), I can confirm that,
[i]without a proper and thorough BPM culture/attitude present[/i]
with the customer, digitizing becomes a pretty tough gig.


It's amazing to see how companies (in our case especially local governments) go forward with decisions
[i]without a proper overview and insight in what they all are about[/i]
. Or in other words, want to jump at fast moving adaptive case management trains say, whereas they still work with paper based archives.


In short: Without a proper BPM cultural supporting organisation, digitizing is – and I fully agree here with Stuart Chandler here – the same as building a house without a proper fundament.
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