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  3. Thursday, April 16 2015, 09:48 AM
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Very simply, when do you know a business isn't using/doing BPM?
Max Habibi Accepted Answer
Blog Writer
"We send excel files back and forth"
Max Habibi
Capital BPM
max.habibi@capbpm.com
http://www.capbpm.com
Comment
Bravo!
  1. Anatoly Belaychuk
  2. 1 year ago
Upload 'm to Google docs. What's the deal?
  1. Emiel Kelly
  2. 1 year ago
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 1
Emiel Kelly Accepted Answer

When they don't do what they promise.

 

Or even worse; that they don't know that they don't do what they promise. 

 

By the way, then they don't use BPM, they DO BPM. And they don't do it well.
Common Sensei at Procesje.nl
Comment
Are maybe: You can live in any building, only some live a little better than others.
  1. Emiel Kelly
  2. 1 year ago
Agree on your BTW: every company uses BPM because business process management is what a company does, by definition.

It's like every building has an architecture, even if it misses electricity and sanitary facilities.
  1. Anatoly Belaychuk
  2. 1 year ago
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 2
Michal Rykiert Accepted Answer

When nobody seems to know what's the status of certain case/process/document, etc.
Comment
I think this is indeed the core of bpm. And then I would focus in the status of cases. So this monitoring is what good bpm should start with.
  1. Emiel Kelly
  2. 1 year ago
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 3
Patrick Lujan Accepted Answer
Blog Writer

Non-standardized, no consistent repeatable process(es). No insight - no one knows what's going on short of picking up a phone or keyboard. High variability in task completion, response times. This actually exists to one degree or another in all organizations, moreso in those not doing BPM, less and less up the scale for those who do and do it well.
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 4
Ian Gotts Accepted Answer

To the customer: inconsistent or just plain awful customer experience.


To the employee: every day is a struggle to get things done.


To CEO and senior executives: no impact. They don't meet the customers and they are above operational processes.
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 5
Amy Barth Accepted Answer

When a user has to open six or seven different screens in three or four different programs to get one answer to proceed to the next "step," and repeat ad nauseum.
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 6
E Scott Menter Accepted Answer
Blog Writer

"Hey, Bill, were you able to review that purchase order request? We get a 10% discount if we order by today."


"What purchase order request?"



http://www.bplogix.com/images/icon-x-medium.png Scott
Comment
Hey, I know those guys. ;)
  1. Patrick Lujan
  2. 1 year ago
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 7
Maria Paz Accepted Answer

This is a tricky issue. The consequences of not using BPM are varied, e.g. competitive loss, operative inefficiencies, bad customer experience, etc. None of those can be easily identified at first glance.


One of those effects was previously discussed in this forum: staff dissatisfaction. When processes are not properly defined and measured, employees cannot be correctly evaluated. This leads to staff turnover. A high turnover of staff could be explained by staff demotivation due to a lack of processes organization. BPM could solve some of these problems.


A few days ago I wrote a [url="http://www.flokzu.com/en/hr/talent-retention-in-a-structured-business/"]post [/url]about this topic and how to overcome staff dissatisfaction using BPM.
References
  1. http://www.flokzu.com/en
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 8

A quote from the back cover page of my book “Each process-centric enterprise has some BPM, but how can we industrialise this BPM?” (Note: As any modern enterprise uses some “division of labour” and “division of work” then processes are mandatory for coordination of people.)


So, Emiel and Anatoly are correct in their observation that enterprises are using/doing BPM even they don’t know about it.


My test about not using potentials of BPM is that to know the situation with a particular process instance you have to know who is doing the current activity in this process instance and be a friend to this person.


Thanks,

AS
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 9
Bogdan Nafornita Accepted Answer

When the IT department imposes a server storage quota for Outlook / Lotus Notes mailboxes :-)
Managing Founder, profluo.com
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 10
Juan J Moreno Accepted Answer

I agree with most of the previous comments, especially Max Habibi, everyone has seen Excels flying from desk to desk :-)


In public administration, especially in Latam, it happens to lost papers (I mean, process instances supported on paper). And the whole process instance is lost, no recovery.


So, what’s the symptom? Mainly two:


- People asking/screaming “Where is that file???”


- and worst, citizen complaints (maybe lawsuits)


In fact, there is a whole BPM industry in Latam to provide BPM solutions to Governments engaged in eGovernment initiatives to mitigate these problems (for example, [url="http://www.integradoc.com"]INTEGRADOC[/url])

References
  1. http://www.integradoc.com/INGLES/soluciones.html
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 11
Jose Camacho Accepted Answer

Company isn't using BPM when is not repeating the business processes under a standard, which means that is not being able to measure and improve their own business operations at level of efficiency and efectiveness.
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 12
John Morris Accepted Answer

I love this topic and the comments! Any sales person for BPM technology or services can use this as a quick ref on customer pain! Want to sell BPM technology into finance? Ask if it's all about "sharing spreadsheets" etc. And do they every get out of sync etc.? Yikes!


I note the reference by @Maria to "staff turnover", which I suppose is an indirect symptom of bad business process. But this problem highlights an important aspect of work, which is "cognitive load" and "work friction".


It's both intuitive and well-documented that badly structured work is demoralizing. We like to consider that we're contributing to the success of the team and the organization. And struggling to reconcile spreadsheets or to find missing underwriting documents is just friction, cognitive load for nothing, a waste. At the water cooler we'll hear frank comments about stupidity. And we all intuitively understand that there's a better way, whether we give it the name BPM or not.


So, poor morale might be a symptom of bad work organization. Fifty years ago we had had business forms and all sorts of interesting paper filing systems to make work flow as good as it could be. Now we have software technology, of which BPM is the backbone of work organization.
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 13
Peter Hilton Accepted Answer

Yet another clear sign that a company isn’t doing BPM, is important work with a [url="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bus_factor"]Bus Factor[/url] of 1. If you’re a lucky customer, then your case only goes on hold until the right person gets back from holiday.


The same thing from an internal perspective is when you get back from holiday to discover that all of the work that you would have done if you hadn’t been away is piled up on your desk. Literally piled up - because everything’s based on paper, of course. The only thing that’s worse is the second time you go on holiday, once your colleagues realise the impact of you going away, and before you’ve learned to keep holiday plans secret: you get so overloaded in the weeks leading up to your holiday that by the time you go on holiday, you need a holiday to recover.


And then there’s the passive-aggressive use of out-of-office notifications, but I’d better stop here.
References
  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bus_factor
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 14
Gary Samuelson Accepted Answer

Why no mention of a business process maturity model (BPMM)?

- There are many to choose from (count is running at roughly 70+) per Amy Looy's research (see below reference).


"A sample of 69 BPMMs was collected: (1) 37 BPMMs for generic business processes (13 academic and 24 non-academic), (2) 24 BPMMs for supply chains (9 academic and 15 non-academic), and (3) 8 BPMMs for process collaboration (6 academic and 2 non-academic)" [Van Looy 2014].


 


Van Looy, Amy.
[b]Business process maturity: a comparative study on a sample of business process maturity models[/b]
. Springer Science & Business Media, 2014.


 


 
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
  2. BPM Discussions
  3. # 15
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