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  1. Peter Schooff
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  3. Thursday, September 18 2014, 09:44 AM
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There has been some recent discussion on bring-your-own process with BPM. How big of a role do you think it will play, and exactly how individually customized do you see processes becoming in the future?
Ian Gotts Accepted Answer
Shortly followed by bring-your-own-compliance-fine for some industries (food & pharma, FS, oil & gas)?
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
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Keith Swenson Accepted Answer
There is a trend toward smaller, more flexible companies. The ability to integrate those smaller partners "on demand" into the overall process is a powerful way to help make business processes that cross organizational boundaries work. Of course, those partners will want to bring their own processes -- because the way they accomplish something is their key differentiator! For this case BYOP is critical.

I think the trend will also continue with people who are knowledge workers within a company. Individualized and customized service to the particular situation will remain to be powerful drivers for business. No customer like to be herded like cattle. Companies who have experts who can identify a particular 'tribe' and do the process right for them, will win in the long run. This is another kind of BYOP.
References
  1. http://social-biz.org/2013/07/08/adaptability-as-a-competitive-advantage/
Comment
Keith, is it possible (and think it is) that the BYOP question is related to your recent post on business etiquette modeling, emergent behaviour and bird "murmurations"? For anyone interested, here is the original reference to Mr. Swenson's post:

social-biz.org/2014/09/08/business-etiquette-modeling-a-new-paradigm-for-process/

As you say "customers don't like to be herded like cattle"; may I add "neither do employees". And there is a lot of power waiting to be unleashed when employees have better tools.
  1. John Morris
  2. 2 years ago
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Emiel Kelly Accepted Answer
I always have a hard time to visualize what 'bring your own process' means.

The only thing I can think of is a customer coming to me and asking 'I want you to do this for me in the way that I like it'

Why would he do that? because I have specialistic tools? I have specialistic knowledge?

Maybe this discussion will bring me to other insights.
Common Sensei at Procesje.nl
Comment
You're not missing anything. BYO"anything" is more hyperbole and will be a drop in the bucket just like BYOD will be. Why? Security, liability, manageability.

Now I'll sit back and wait, watch for the "fool with a tool" argument be conflated with lack of flexibility.
  1. Patrick Lujan
  2. 2 years ago
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Patrick Lujan Accepted Answer
Blog Writer
Small role, individually customized processes few and far in between in the future. Why? R...O...I...
Comment
Patrick, your comment is unfortunately correct and explains the prison of Soviet-style software that we all have to live in. Because of institutions can never justify "empowering the personal" according to ROI -- and this includes the "mass customized" offerings from smart marketing departments today. One does not "own" what one is given for free.
  1. John Morris
  2. 2 years ago
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  3. # 4
Guest Accepted Answer
What the is BYOP? I have no clue. Can't imagine. Any reference?
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Garvin Fouts Accepted Answer
Blog Writer
I am not sure where the context for this question comes from and would probably help with answers. I am not sure this makes sense as how would clients (external or internal) know what process to even bring or define? If I am asking for invoice payment, would I bring my own process requiring no approvals, just get to Accounts Payable to cut me a check?

Flexibility is always a key factor for internal processes and allowing that in the greater process definition for variations is best practice but I am not sure this BYOP works except maybe in very niche applications.
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  1. more than a month ago
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Peter Johnston Accepted Answer
If you go into a marketing department these days, you can watch process design at work. Any intern can set up a landing page for an email campaign, then create a nurturing sequence – effectively a decision tree of subsequent actions – on the fly. No IT people are involved and they don’t need to be in the office to do this – they can do it on their mobile phone on the train if they want.

If you look closely at an e-commerce site you’ll see another side of process design. Data drives the process, ranking products, changing prices and creating special offers all on the fly, without human involvement. A totally self-learning process to optimise sales and profits.

And on millions of mobiles there’s a third, best shown by the website IFTTT – If This, Then That. People setting up simple rules for simple tasks. Connecting data sources on the fly. We’re in a world where you can, with no previous experience, create your own App in an Afternoon (http://www.meetup.com/app-afternoon/).

Taking months or years to create a process map, forms and integrations and launch the process is simply too slow for the modern world.
Adding up processor licences, prices per seat, transaction charges and consultant costs is too expensive.
And guru methodologies from the industrial era are quite simply too old-hat. Knowledge which once was special (and valuable) is now widespread. People can test - failing fast and often on a path to creating better processes than a guru ever could.

We’re living in a world where baby-boomers are playing old-tech – arduous, long-drawn out, management intensive, expensive ways of changing processes which doom companies to a slow pace of change. But the companies they are doing it for are dying out, outcompeted by more agile, younger competitors.

Bring Your Own Process, Machine Learning Process and UX-driven Instant Process - these are the future. It is time to decide – are you part of the problem or part of the solution?
Dynamic Process
Oxfordshire, UK
+44 (0) 1491 874368
+44 (0) 7590 677232
#dynamic_process
peter@dynamicprocess.uk
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 7
David Chassels Accepted Answer
It was Peter Keen in his Process Edge that highlight the fact that good processes are assets BUT as long as they remain flexible. If not they can quickly become liabilities. So it is not just customized processes it is that vital ability to change. This may well involve People bringing in their own processes that add value to business outcomes; nothing should be off the agenda!

A point of relevance is the differentiation between formal and informal processes. The former will often be compliance driven to ensure full audit trail of activity to satisfy the regulators. However many processes are informal maybe only driven by time and the desired outcome. May well be part of a value network spanning the whole organisation. Here knowledge is valuable and the process outcomes at least formally recognised with supporting software.

All this allows both empowerment of people and the encouragement to see change as the norm without traditional IT barriers.
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Emiel Kelly Accepted Answer
Summary till so far:

- Flexible/Adaptive processes
- Knowledge workers
- Customized

What's new? That's just how business can be run these days, but I still don't understand who his bringing his own process?

But should I care? As long as they bring their own beer....
Common Sensei at Procesje.nl
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 9
So far, BYOP sounds like Make-Your-Own-Process-Ignore-Aftereffects (MYOPIA).

Sure, changing of processes should not be more complex than cooking – almost everyone can follow proven recipes, somebody can modify a recipe for his/her taste and there are people who invent new recipes. What is important is that good recipes are available.

Process patterns are recipes to avoid MYOPIA.

I think, the BPM industry should provide a set of practical process patterns (not workflow patterns) for the business.

Happy to contribute with my collection - http://improving-bpm-systems.blogspot.ch/search/label/practical%20process%20patterns

Thanks,
AS
Comment
Spot on with the "MYOPIA" Dr. S. I like that, am gonna use it.

Cheers, Pat
  1. Patrick Lujan
  2. 2 years ago
Love the MYOPIA acronym -- and anyone thinking of building a new process should check first to see if one of your process patterns are applicable.

As for the BYO issue, after reading your comment, it occurs to me that BYOP has two potential meanings: (1) BYO "re-invented process because you didn't take the time to conform to standards" and (2) relating to "personal process platforms".

Concerning Definition No. 1, willy-nilly proliferation of new processes, this is how we work now, but shouldn't work in the future. It's as if everyone decided to build their own accounting systems according to PAAP (Personally Accepted Accounting Principles). And the result is disorder where it's not necessary.

Concerning Definition No. 2, allow me to suggest my contribution below, that concept of a partitioned personal process platform, that is the interface to common group processes.

The two approaches should be complimentary. Great common patterns and great personal software.
  1. John Morris
  2. 2 years ago
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  3. # 10
John Morris Accepted Answer
Today's question is among the most important of questions concerning users of technology.

Many of us recently enjoyed Keith Swenson's blog posting about "business etiquette modeling", and the video of bird "murmurations" (a wonderful new word for me) where the emergent behaviour of the flock is explained by simple rules followed by each individual.

Here is the original reference:

http://social-biz.org/2014/09/08/business-etiquette-modeling-a-new-paradigm-for-process/

I mention this recent posting because I believe the etiquette modeling question is related to the question at hand, that of "BYOProcess". For argument's sake I will take the "end case" of process as referring to an individual. Thus we have a question, "is there a future for individual work processes". The original question was "do you think this could be important in the future". My answer is "yes" and that there are few software questions that are as important.

Most software now is built "from the top down", with Soviet-style command and control. And the individual is an after-thought. The result is often terrible software, at least for the individuals forced to shoe-horn themselves into poor work models. For example, if I put on my sales hat, I can say there are few categories of software where most of the members of the set are as bad as what sales software is for the B2B sales professional.

Now imagine an alternative: autonomous human actors acquire a flavour of software early in life, out of perhaps several available. And then they immerse themselves in this software -- for life. And when you go to work, you work "in your own software".

And the software is smart enough to have a rigorous divide between private, public and work. You are now the "empowered autonomous human actor". And from everyone with whom you work, wonderful group emergent behaviour happens. And you connect with business software as required.

Constructing this software requires sophisticated "ontologies of the personal". They don't exist yet, although we are much further along than when I first explored this topic over 10 years ago.

[img]http://www.decisionmodels.org/sites/default/files/Big%20Red%20Box%20On%20Wheels%202010s%20V%201.0.png[/img]
There is a real model for this type of work already in existence -- and that is the work of the auto mechanic. An auto mechanic owns his or her own tools, stored in a "big red box on wheels". And one selects the tools that one likes to work with -- and typically mechanics don't lend tools to each other. And when you change jobs -- the pickup truck backs up to the bay, and you roll your tools into the truck and take them with you. And when you start at the new job, you pick up the tools with which you are already intimately familiar.

What a practical model for office workers and software!

Here is my blog post on this topic, complete with a picture of a "big red toolbox on wheels":

http://www.decisionmodels.org/content/big-red-box-wheels-ontologies-personal-fois-10

Here is an essay on "ontologies of the personal", including my speculation as to why we have constructed software on such a poor foundation:

http://personalontologies.com/

Here you can find (2nd last presentation) a PDF PPT summarizing these concepts on a panel at a conference (look for "John Morris";):

http://ermolayev.com/eva_personal/PS/ER2002panelOntologies.pdf

Imagine software that is first and foremost one's own tool kit. We are moving in this direction. But there's a long way to go. And the question is so complicated that only ontology can bear the weight of the requirements. When we get to this place, the organizations that provide the focus of organized work will also benefit from emergent systems behaviour that is both desirable and far surpasses anything constructed using traditional methods.

As for our starting point, i.e. business process software itself, as much of software is about helping us perform work, and business process software is the software that explicitly surfaces and concerns the artefacts and symbols of work, then ontology-based business processes will be a key component of the BYO personal software platform of the future.
Comment
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 11
Bogdan Nafornita Accepted Answer
Isn't BYOP just another fancy name for "sub-contract you", maybe with a commercial contract in the form of an API?

(haha, what the hell did I just say? :D )
Managing Founder, profluo.com
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