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  1. Peter Schooff
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With less people and fewer resources, in your experience, how is BPM different for SMBs?
Guest Accepted Answer
Great question. I am curios to know the what the community here thinks about this
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 1
Larry Hawes Accepted Answer
In my experience, BPM for SMBs involves more external (third-party) actors than in large enterprises. So it is critical for enabling systems to provide secure, cross-firewall process hand-offs. And the system must be easy to use, as most SMBs don't have the internal IT support resources of large enterprises.
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 2
Shelley Sweet Accepted Answer
Blog Writer
I immediately thought it was quite different but as I started naming places, I was not sure. I think it is more necessary to get CEO support, and probably easier. If you don't have that support, you probably just don't do BPM in a small company. I think it might be more likely that they choose core processes to start on. I know since they have fewer people , the BPM teams for projects will be smaller.I have worked with two small companies (under 20 people). For all of them, these 3 things were true. I, too, look forward to see what others say.
Comment
It depends what is small. Probably 100 employees is lower end.
  1. Ian Gotts
  2. 2 years ago
  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 3
Ian Gotts Accepted Answer
It costs less but requires more commitment. But the competitive advantage is HUGE as so few SMBs ever do it right.
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 4
Tim Bryce Accepted Answer
No difference whatsoever, other than you can move faster in smaller companies than in large.
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 5
Considering that a company with approx. 100 staff members. Typical concerns as I noticed:

- high dependency on knowledge of key people (worst case – “primadonna” effect)

- automation of manual activities brings big improvements

- easier to take a decision, but no risky technology to try

Thus agile, incremental, cloud-based, secured and proven BPM practices are ideal for SMB.

Thanks,
AS
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 6
David Chassels Accepted Answer
With SMB/SMEs it will be a business decision so if they "get it" it will happen as there a fewer "IT" barriers. We reckon the low end in numbers is 20 and of course the plan will likely involve expansion so the CEO and CFO want it to assist as the business grows. The cost factor is important and a single platform with low technology overhead with no need for code writing certainly lowers cost. All this opens doors to SMBs where historically the complex different required components made just out of reach.

The reality is that this front end BPM collaboration actually involves relatively few people even in big organisations. So opening up to SMB is not that different in approach. It will come down to cost/VFM and forward thinking SMB owners will quickly see the benefits. They will take seriously recognising there could be competitive advantages by adopting this "outside in" digitisation and associated capabilities.
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 7
Peter Johnston Accepted Answer
Most companies have a triangular structure. Only the top levels are allowed to make big decisions.
But the intelligence for those decisions comes in at the bottom – to the frontline people actually dealing with the customers, suppliers and business partners. Changes often have to work their way up the company by a sort of capillary action, influencing one, who influences the next level up and so on.

The bigger the company the less intelligence influences the decisions. We have to bridge that gap in developing processes. We have to connect intelligence with decision-making.

Easier in a smaller company – the high-level people are naturally closer to their market, their supply-chain and their business partners.

But it is often balanced by Rumsfeld’s not knowing what they don’t know. Big companies have long recognised the lack of intelligence and done something about it. They are up to their ears in analyst reports, surveys and industry best practices. In smaller companies the problem is often helping them recognise they have a problem.
Dynamic Process
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peter@dynamicprocess.uk
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 8
Bogdan Nafornita Accepted Answer
BPM for SMB must be very very very different versus BPM for large enterprises, and thank God for that, as this is going to finally make BPM what it deserves to be.

It is as different as its key components:
- waterfall development vs lean/agile/scrum development
- high-level visual design vs low-level source code design
- no BPM overhead vs high BPM overhead (project managers, testers, steering comittees, project sponsorship meetings)
- cloud deployment vs on-premise deployment
- customer-outcome-focused vs internal-orgchart-focused
....

- future vs past/present
Managing Founder, profluo.com
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 9
Michael Lee Accepted Answer
I like the differences pointed out by Bogdan. In my experience a couple other differences include decision paralysis because even with management support there is often indecision about where to start if the company has no experience with BPM and if they have no experience with ECM then the process can get even more cloudy.

Conversely there is the case of a motivated management team that wants try and eat the whole hog at once. We strive to start with a single small process with large impact and grow from there and avoid the big project meltdown.
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  1. more than a month ago
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